A good city is like a good party…

Bangkok, Hong Kong, Cairo, London, Beijing, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Manila… some of the biggest and most densely populated urban areas I have visited or spent an extended time.

I smile when I think about many people I know in Latvia who complain when they have to go to the “big city” of Riga, our capital. They start talking about the cars, the people, the noise, the bad air… I think to myself, “You have no idea what it means to have lots of traffic, crowds, concrete, noise and air pollution.”

I love these cities and I hate them. I love them because there are so many things to do and see and I hate them because it takes ‘forever’ to get to those places. I love them because there is so much energy and creativity and I hate them because these cities ‘never’ sleep. I love them because they offer many good jobs and I hate them because they take people away from other places they don’t actually want to leave. I love them because there are so many people to be loved and I hate them because there is so much social injustice.

I am a city girl but I am also a country girl. I feel good in both and I need both. I think how the human story starts in the Garden of Eden and it continues in the new City. It sounds like there is an amazing place awaiting us. Maybe it is as nice and clean and green and enjoyable as Singapore and then hundred times better. I do believe that God must be an amazing urban planner… The sky will be blue, the weather will be perfect, the streets will be wide, the community will be whole. Hopefully no cars since we will not have to hurry. If there is no time, there is no hurry. We will get to places not too late and not too early.

My brother is an architect. He works in London and likes to share some of his ‘pearls of wisdom’ with me. Once he shared a quote which I have never forgotten. “First create life, then spaces, then buildings – the other way around never works.” These are words by a renowned architect, Jan Gehl, from Denmark who has devoted much of his life to improving the quality of urban life by re-orienting city design towards the pedestrian and cyclist.

Unfortunately in so many places I feel like it is the other way around. Like good and enjoyable and sustainable life is the last priority. These megacities are places of so much concentrated wealth and power and under the shiny facade there is often another tale. Tale of abuse of this wealth and power which means that the good life is not for everyone.

Jan Gehl also said that “In a society becoming steadily more privatized with private homes, cars, computers, offices and shopping centers, the public component of our lives is disappearing. It is more and more important to make the cities inviting, so we can meet our fellow citizens face to face and experience directly through our senses. Public life in good quality public spaces is an important part of a democratic life and a full life” and “A good city is like a good party – people stay longer than really necessary, because they are enjoying themselves.”

Where do you enjoy yourself?

DSCN1873

Hong Kong… one of the places I could stay longer

Bangkoka, Honkonga, Kaira, Londona, Pekina, Losandželosa, Mehiko, Manila… vesels saraksts ar milzīgām un pārapdzīvotām metropolēm, kur esmu bijusi vai dzīvojusi.

Pasmaidu, kad dzirdu pazīstamus cilvēkus Latvijā sūdzamies, ka jābrauc uz “lielpilsētu” Rīgu. Tur esot tik daudz mašīnu, asfalta, cilvēku, trokšņu, un neesot, ko elpot. Es iedomājos, ko viņi teiktu šajās vietās, kur ir pavisam citi mērogi un cita nozīme vārdiem “sastrēgumi, satiksme, drūzma, burzma, asfalts, betons, troksnis un gaisa piesārņojums…”

Es gan mīlu, gan ienīstu šīs milzīgās pilsētas. Mīlu, jo te ir tik daudz ko redzēt un darīt, bet ienīstu to, ka jābrauc tik ‘tālu’ un tik ‘ilgi’. Mīlu, jo te ir tik daudz enerģijas un radošuma, bet ienīstu to, ka šīs pilsētas nekad ‘neguļ’. Mīlu, jo cilvēki var atrast labāku darbu, bet ienīstu to, ka daudziem jābrauc prom no sev mīļām vietām un mīļiem cilvēkiem, kurus negribas atstāt. Mīlu, jo te ir tik daudz cilvēku, ko mīlēt, bet ienīstu to, ka tik daudz netaisnības un sociālas nevienlīdzības.

Esmu gan pilsētas, gan lauku meitene. Man patīk un man vajag abas šīs vides. Nav jau brīnums, jo arī cilvēces stāsts iesākās Ēdenes dārzā, bet turpinās jaunā Pilsētā. Izklausās, ka tā būs apbrīnojama vieta. Varbūt tik jauka, tīra, zaļa, ērta kā Singapūra, bet simtreiz labāka. Man nav ne mazāko šaubu, ka Dievs ir vislabākais pilsētplānotājs… Debesis būs zilas, klimats būs perfekts, ielas būs platas, cilvēki vislabākajās attiecībās ar sevi, citem un apkārtējo vidi. Klusi ceru, ka nebūs mašīnu, jo nebūs taču nekur jāsteidzas. Ja nav laika mūsu izpratnē, tad nav arī steigas. Visur nokļūsim ne par ātru, ne par vēlu.

Viens no maniem brāļiem ir arhitekts. Strādā Londonā, un viņam ir daudz visādas ‘gudrības pērles’. Reiz viņš man atsūtīja kādu citātu, ko vēl joprojām atceros. “Vispirms radi dzīvi, tad radi vietu, un tad ēkas – no otra gala nevar sākt.” Šos vārdus teicis pasaules atzinību guvis arhitekts Jans Gēls no Dānijas, kurš savu darbu ir veltījis pilsētas dzīves kvalitātes uzlabošanai, rodot jaunus pilsētdizainus, kas dod priekšroku gājējiem un riteņbraucējiem.

Diemžēl daudzās vietās ir sajūta, ka tiešām sākts no otra gala. Un labā un ilgtspējīgā dzīve ir atstāta pēdējā vietā. Šajās metropolēs ir tik daudz bagātības un spēka koncentrācijas, bet zem spoguļstiklu fasādes slēpjas vēl kāds stāsts. Stāsts par šīs bagātības un spēka ļaunprātīgu izmantošanu, kas labo dzīvi piedāvā ne visiem.

Jans Gēls apgalvo, ka “sabiedrībā, kura kļūst arvien privātāka, jo ir privātās mājas, auto, datori, ofisi un iepirkšanās centri, sāk pazust mūsu dzīves publiskā daļa. Arvien svarīgāk ir padarīt mūsu pilsētas viesmīlīgas, lai mēs varētu satikties ar pārējiem iedzīvotājiem un piedzīvot šo saskarsmi vistiešākajā veidā. Publiskā dzīve labas kvalitātes publiskās vietās ir nepieciešama demokrātiskai un pilnvērtīgai dzīvei.” Un vēl viņš salīdzina “labu pilsētu ar labu tusiņu, kur cilvēki paliek ilgāk kā vajadzīgs, jo viņiem tur patīk.”

Kur tu gribētu palikt ilgāk?

This one goes out to Brussels

So, this week I was away from the Internet for a few days and quite enjoyed it. No Donald Trump, no Apple and FBI, no crisis, no war, no bad news… actually no news. I was teaching in a remote place on Thailand – Myanmar border, surrounded by farms, villages and beautiful mountains. I enjoyed the sound of roosters, dogs barking and some of my new friends singing while they are taking a shower or working outside. All I had to worry about was making sure my mosquito net was fully tucked in at night.

Whenever I am away from the Internet for more than three days while traveling, my greatest fear is that someone in my family will get hurt or even die and I will find out much later. I make sure my relatives have our phone number in Thailand or wherever but they still prefer to contact me through social media. Little frustrating but this is how it goes.

Life is a mysterious thing with lots of irony. I left my peaceful surroundings to find out that indeed somebody has died. Not in my family but in many other families. People in Belgium and other countries have lost their loved ones because of a senseless act of violence. Even the families of the suicide bombers have lost their loved ones – these guys were somebody’s sons and brothers and cousins. Evil does not discriminate, it destroys everyone in its path. It has no preferred race, gender or religion.

Another irony was that during those days I was teaching about peace building and reconciliation. Even using Europe Union as an example of peace and stability and how in 2012 it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for “over six decades [having] contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe.” Of course, I told my students that Europeans are not perfect and there are many issues and challenges but we have come a long way from being a continent of constant wars and feuds.

I really did not want to hear such bad news. Not from Brussels or anywhere else. Not from Istanbul, not from Ankara, not from Baghdad, not from Paris, not from cities in Pakistan or Nigeria or Yemen. Each place where people experience this kind of evil, is traumatized and the scars remain. Life is not the same anymore…

Life is not the same for people in Belgium. It is not the same to go to the metro and to think that so many people did not reach the next station. Did not reach their job, their school, their family. It will not be the same to go back to Brussels airport and to think that the anticipation of travel and joy of having a vacation turned out to be ‘the wrong place at the wrong time.’

I am very sorry. Words fall short at such a time as this.

But I am also more than ever determined to continue to walk the road of peace. I do not mean being naive or singing “We are the world, we are the children” and proclaiming that some kind of positive thinking will take these evil things away. Evil is real and people make really evil choices. At the same time I will not join those who will find the fix-it-all solution in violence and declare “Nuke them all!”

Many have already written and many others will write articles and expert opinions about Belgium. There is plenty of blame to go around and people who are most affected will deal with their grief in many ways.

I don’t know if this was planned on Easter week or it was simply a chosen date. It does not matter. But it matters to me that Easter events from so long ago deal with exactly this kind of human experience. The Light came into the darkness and there was a moment when the darkness celebrated a victory. But its victory was short lived.

The Light is risen indeed. It is back with a universe-changing kind of force and the first words we –  the frightened, the bruised, the hopeless, the grieving – hear is “Do not be afraid. Peace be with you!”

12

Title photo from the Internet; this one is mine.

Latviski:

Tas nenotiek pārāk bieži, ka varu atpūsties no interneta, bet pagājušajā nedēļā tādas bija vairākas dienas. Nekāda Donalda Trampa, nekādu strīdu starp Apple un ASV drošības dienestiem, nekādu karu, nekādu sliktu ziņu… vienkārši nekādu ziņu. Man bija jāpasniedz lekcijas nomaļā ciematā netālu no Taizemes – Mjanmas robežas, kur apkārt ir tikai lauki, mazi miestiņi un džungļiem klāti kalni. Varēju klausīties vistu kladzināšanā, suņu rejās un manu draugu dziesmās, kamēr viņi strādā vai mazgājas. Vienīgais, par ko bija jāuztraucas vakaros, vai odu tīkls virs gultas ir kārtīgi noslēgts.

Pārbraucienu un darba laikā, kad neesmu tikusi pie interneta ilgāk kā trīs dienas, visvairāk uztraucos par to, ka kāds mans radinieks varētu ciest negadījumā vai pēkšņi nomirt, un es to uzzinātu krietni vēlāk. (Esmu bijusi līdzīgā situācijā.) Prombūtnē no Latvijas vienmēr iedodu radiem savu telefona numuru Taizemē vai kur citur, bet vienalga viņi parasti komunicē caur soctīkliem. Tas mazliet kaitina, bet ko padarīsi.

Dzīvē ir daudz noslēpumu un ironijas. Es atstāju savu ‘miera ostu’ pierobežā un, atgriežoties pilsētā, uzzināju, ka kāds tiešām ir miris. Tikai ne manā ģimenē. Cilvēki Beļģijā un citās valstīs ir zaudējuši savus mīļos caur briesmīgu vardarbību. Arī pašnāvnieku spridzinātāju ģimenes ir zaudējušas savējos mīļos – šie puiši bija kādam dēli, brāļi un brālēni. Ļaunums nav diskrimējošs; tas iznīcina visu savā ceļā. Tas nešķiro pēc rases, dzimuma vai reliģijas.

Visdziļākā ironija man personīgi bija tas, ka manas lekcijas bija veltītas miera celšanas un izlīguma tēmai. Es pat izmantoju Eiropas Savienību kā piemēru, un minēju 2012. gadā piešķirto Nobela Miera prēmiju  par miera un izlīguma, demokrātijas un cilvēktiesību veicināšanu Eiropā. Protams, es skaidroju studentiem, ka eiropieši nav perfekti, un mums ir daudz problēmu un izaicinājumu, bet mēs tomēr esam pielikuši daudz pūliņu, lai pārveidotu šo karojošo kontinentu par reģionu, kur valda miers.

Es tiešām negribēju dzirdēt šādas sliktas ziņas. Ne no Briseles, ne no citurienes. Ne no Stambulas, ne no Ankāras, ne no Bagdādes, ne no Parīzes, ne no pilsētām Pakistānā vai Nigērijā vai Jemenā. Katra vieta, kas piedzīvo šādu ļaunumu, ir dziļi traumēta, un šīs rētas paliek. Dzīve vairs nav tāda kā agrāk…

Dzīve Beļģijā ir mainījusies. Tagad, ejot uz metro staciju, tu iedomāsies par tiem, kuri nesasniedza savu nākamo pieturu. Kuri nesasniedza savu darbu, vai skolu, vai mājas. Braucot uz Briseles lidostu tu iedomāsies par tiem, kuriem ceļojuma prieka un brīvdienu baudas vietā bija tā nelaime atrasties “neīstajā vietā un neīstajā brīdī.”

Man patiešām ļoti žēl. Nav vārdu, kas to var līdz galam aprakstīt.

Bet man ir vēl viena reakcija. Šī traģēdija man palīdz vēl vairāk un skaidrāk apņemties turpināt savu darbu miera celšanas jomā. Es negribu, lai mēs būtu naivi, vai vienkārši, rokās sadevušies, dziedātu dziesmiņas, ka esam “pasaule un pasaules bērni”, vai sludinātu, ka pozitīvā domāšana palīdzēs atvairīt visus ļaunos uzbrukumus, vai arī par tiem nedomāt. Ļaunums ir reāls, un cilvēki izvēlas darīt ļaunas lietas. Tajā pašā laikā es nepievienošos otrai nometnei, kas atrod vienkāršu vardarbīgu risinājumu – uzspridzināt viņus visus!

Daudzi jau ir izteikušies, un vēl daudzi rakstīs savas domas un ekspertu atzinumus par Beļģiju, par Eiropu. Tiks meklēti vainīgie, tiks meklētas atbildes, un cilvēki, kuri cieta vistiešākajā veidā, izrādīs savas sēras dažādos veidos.

Es nezinu, vai šie uzbrukumi tika plānoti Lieldienu nedēļas laikā ar nolūku, vai arī tas bija vienkārši izdevīgs datums. Tam nav nozīmes. Bet nozīme ir patiesībai, ka vēsturiskie Lieldienu notikumi aprakstīja mūsu cilvēces pieredzi. Gaisma nāca tumsā, un bija brīdis Golgātas kalnā, kad tumsa svinēja uzvaru. Bet šī uzvara bija ļoti īsa.

Gaisma ir patiesi augšāmcēlusies. Tā atgriezās ar spēku, kas izmaina visu universu, un pirmie vārdi, ko mēs, nobijušies, sāpināti, cerību un ticību labā uzvarai zaudējuši un sērās, izdzirdam, ir “Nebaidieties! Miers ar jums!”

 

 

It could be me, it could be you…

I want to talk about Ukraine in a very personal way and this story starts in Thailand… of all places.

My former home in Chiang Mai was in a small and quiet neighborhood close to Chiang Mai University. There were not many foreigners living there. So, when a foreign family moved in, everyone took notice. I have one of those habits of trying to guess where people are from. My husband and I would look at each other and say, “what do you think? American, British, German?” I saw this new family walking down our street and I said, “Definitely from eastern Europe.”

And then I heard them speak Russian. And then I finally introduced myself and found out that our new neighbors were from Ukraine. (Not born there but it is too long to explain how people moved around in the former Soviet Republics.) David is an astronomer who works for an Observatory and has looked through some of the biggest telescopes in the world. His job is very fascinating but I still don’t remember the name of the specific space objects he researches and teaches about. His wife Sveta and their two children adjusted to the new life in a country far far away from home. I was glad to practice Russian and they were mutually glad to speak their mother tongue.

In 2013 they went to Ukraine for a holiday and family visits and I remember Sveta’s worried look after they came back. I had been following the news of unrest and people’s protests in Kiev and asked them what was going on. Sveta was very anxious and said that if things continued like that, there could be a civil war. I realized at that moment that for me it was an interest but for her it was very personal.

This is what I want to talk about. The personal tragedy of war and conflicts. The deepest tragedy of it, besides death and destruction, is the broken and destroyed relationships. Between friends, colleagues, relatives, siblings, families, even spouses… and, of course, nations.

I remember talking to David many months later when the conflict had become violent, Crimea annexed by Russia, the war in two eastern provinces had started and the propaganda campaign was in full swing. Of course, he was very emotional and clearly and understandably angry about many things, but the deepest pain and grief was the loss of friends. Not physically but relationally. Some of his good friends and colleagues in Russia and Crimea were now on the ‘opposite side’ and held strongly to beliefs that Ukraine is turning into a fascist state and that Putin is the savior with the best intentions.

David described this pain as similar to grieving over someone’s death. And he is not the only one. There are thousands, even millions of people who have experienced this grief and loss. I have met other Ukrainians with the same story. It is hard to imagine two other nations that used to be as closely connected as Ukraine and Russia. Through culture, history, economy, religion, family ties. Thousands of intermarried families who never used to think in terms of their nationalities. So many Ukrainians have relatives in Russia and vice versa.

Now there are countless families that don’t even talk to each other, that have cut off any contact. One young family I also met in Chiang Mai were serving as volunteers at an orphanage in Thailand. Their hometown in Ukraine is Kharkiv. In her youth, Yulia lived in Crimea and she has her own perspective on the challenges and situation but her aunts who live in Russia and used to call her all the time, now have stopped calling.

Yulia also had a story of being at the post office in her home town during the early days of the conflict and some people getting upset because her little daughter had hair ribbons with the colors of Ukraine national flag. The hostility and anger was very real and scary. She was helped by another customer who got them out of the situation. I can only imagine what a trauma it was for her little girl. Because of hair ribbons!

And one more story. During a visit to Minneapolis, USA I met an older gentleman, Viktor who is an active member of local Russian speaking Pentecostal church. He was born in Ukraine, came from a pastor’s family and was very much a patriot of his birthplace. This church in Twin Cities was very multinational – people from all over former Soviet Union who were united by their faith in God and worship in Russian language. Then the war in Ukraine started and the church was very active in praying for peace and sending aid to afflicted people. Viktor told me about his personal pain how the church was affected by it all. He said, “When we started praying for Ukraine, there were church members who said that they will leave the church if we keep supporting Ukraine.” I asked how they responded to this and he replied, “Well, we tried to talk. We decided that we need to sit down and listen to each other and seek unity as Christians above all else.”

When I pray for peace in Ukraine, I think about David, Sveta, Yulia, Viktor and many others. I think about myself. It could have been me. It could have been you. What if I lost friendship with my colleagues? What if I lost contact with my relatives? What if my church was splitting because of war? How would I respond? I hope that I would respond with as much grace and humility as my friends have.

I believe that peace will come, that Ukraine will find its identity and the suffering will not be in vain. Meanwhile I grieve with those who are grieving and pray for a time of healing and restoration.

world_06_temp-1394954216-53254fe8-620x348

Photos from the Internet

Latviski:

Es gribu pastāstīt ko ļoti personīgu par Ukrainu, un, kas to būtu domājis, ka stāsts iesāksies Taizemē.

Mana agrākā dzīves vieta Čangmai pilsētā bija mazā un mierīgā rajonā netālu no lielākās universitātes. Tur nebija daudz ārzemnieku, tāpēc katrs iebraucējs tika ievērots un novērots. Man arī piemīt tāds ieradums novērot cilvēkus un mēģināt uzminēt, kādas tautības viņi ir. Sava veida derības ar vīru, kad viens otram jautājam – kā tu domā, no kurienes viņi ir? Amerikāņi, briti, vācieši? Mūsu mazajā ieliņā ievēroju kādu jaunu ģimeni, un uzreiz ‘secināju’ – viņi ir Austrumeiropas.

Un tad viņi pagāja man garām, un izdzirdēju krievu valodu. Līdz kādu dienu saņēmos (tādi mēs, eiropieši, esam) un iepazinos. Izrādījās, ka jaunie kaimiņi ir no Ukrainas. Dzimuši gan Gruzijā un Kazahstānā, bet mums, Latvijā, ir saprotams, kā cilvēki pārvietojās bijušajā PSRS darba un studiju dēļ. Dāvids ir astronoms, un strādā Taizemes galvenajā observatorijā. Viņš ir pētījis Visuma brīnumus caur daudziem pasaules lielākajiem teleskopiem, un ilgus gadus strādāja Krimas observatorijā. Es klausos ar milzīgu interesi, bet vienalga nevaru atcerēties nosaukumu tieši tiem objektiem, ko viņš pēta, un par ko pasniedz augstskolās. Viņa sieva Svetlana ar bērniem pamazām pielāgojās dzīvei šajā svešajā valstī tālu no mājām. Es biju priecīga, ka varēju atjaunot savas krievu valodas zināšanas, un bērni bija bezgala priecīgi, ka kāds viņus saprot.

Viņi devās uz Ukrainu nelielā atvaļinājumā pie radiem 2013. gada beigās. Atceros, cik Svetlana bija bēdīga pēc šīs ciemošanās. Apmēram zināju par protestiem Kijevā, cik nu no ziņām var uzzināt un izprast, tāpēc jautāju, kas tur notiek. Sveta ļoti negribīgi atbildēja, ka viņai bail no pilsoņu kara. Tajā brīdī es aptvēru, ka man tā ir vienkārši interese, bet viņai tās ir mājas, radi un draugi.

Par to arī ir šis stāsts. Par šo personisko traģēdiju, ko izraisa karš un konflikti. Visdziļākā sāpe, neskaitot nāvi un sabrukumu, ir izjauktas un iznīcinātas attiecības. Starp draugiem, kolēģiem, radiem, brāļiem un māsām, ģimenēm, pat dzīvesbiedriem un, protams, tautām un valstīm.

Pēc vairākiem mēnešiem runāju ar Dāvidu. Spriedze jau bija pāraugusi vardarbībā, Krievija bija anektējusi Krimu, austrumu provincēs bija sācies bruņots konflikts, un informatīvais karš bija uzņēmis milzīgus apgriezienus. Dāvids runāja ļoti emocionāli, un es varēju saprast viņa dusmas, bet viņā lielākā un dziļākā sāpe bija zaudētie draugi. Ne jau fiziski zaudēti, bet pārrautas attiecības. Daudzi no viņa labākajiem draugiem Krievijā un Krimā tagad bija “pretējā pusē”, un stingri turējās pie savas pārliecības, ka Ukrainā valda fašisti, un vienīgi Putins glābj situāciju un cilvēkus.

Dāvids teica, ka viņš sērojot. It kā kāds būtu nomiris, un vairs nav. Un viņš nebija vienīgais šajās sērās. Tūkstošiem, pat miljoniem cilvēku piedzīvo šo sāpi un zaudējumu. Esmu satikusi citus ukraiņus, kuriem līdzīgs stāsts. Mēs taču zinām, ka bija grūti iedomāties vēl tuvākas un ciešākas attiecības starp divām tautām un nācijām kā Ukraina un Krievija. Visas iespējamās saites – kultūra, valoda, vēsture, ekonomika, reliģija, radi. Tūkstošiem kopā savītu ģimeņu, kur agrāk nešķiroja pēc tautības. Tik daudziem ukraiņiem ir radi Krievijā, un krieviem Ukrainā.

Tagad ir neskaitāmas ģimenes, kur vairs nesazinās viens ar otru, kur šīs radu saites ir pārrautas. Vēl viena jauna ģimene, ko satiku Čangmai, bija atbraukuši uz gadu kā brīvprātīgie palīgi nelielā bērnunamā. Viņu mājas Ukrainā ir Harkivā. Savos pusaudzes gados Jūlija bija dzīvojusi Krimā, un viņai bija savs skats gan uz notikumu attīstību, gan situāciju, bet viņas tantes, kuras dzīvoja Krievijā un agrāk bieži zvanīja, jo ir vecas un vientuļas, bija pārstājušas zvanīt.

Vēl Jūlija pastāstīja kādu epizodi pasta nodaļā Harkivā, kas notika pašā konflikta sākumā. Viena daļa cilvēku bija sadusmojušies, jo viņas mazajai meitiņai matos bija lentītes Ukrainas karoga krāsās. Situācija kļuva visai draudīga, līdz viens svešs vīrietis viņas aizstāvēja un izveda laukā no pasta ēkas. Varu iedomāties, ko juta mazā meitene. Matu lentīšu dēļ!

Un pēdējais piemērs. Ciemojoties Amerikas Savienotajās Valstīs, Mineapolē es satiku kādu vecāku vīru Viktoru, kurš bija aktīvs vietējās krievvalodīgās Vasarssvētku draudzes loceklis. Dzimis Ukrainā un uzaudzis mācītāja ģimenē, Viktors bija liels savas dzimtās zemes patriots. Šī konkrētā draudze bija ļoti starpnacionāla – cilvēki no visām bijušajām PSRS republikām, kurus vienoja ticība Jēzum un pielūgsme krievu valodā. Tad sākās karš Ukrainā, un draudze no visas sirds aizlūdza un sūtīja palīdzību cietušiem cilvēkiem. Viktors man atklāja savu lielāko rūpi. Viņš teica – kad mēs sākām aizlūgt par Ukrainu, bija draudzes locekļi, kuri teica, ka iešot prom no draudzes, ja mēs atbalstīsim Ukrainu. Es jautāju, kā viņi to centās atrisināt, un atbilde bija – caur sarunām un dialogu un pārdomām par to, kas mūs, kristiešus, vieno.

Kad es lūdzu Dievam par mieru Ukrainā, es iedomājos par Dāvidu, Svetu, Jūliju, Viktoru un pārējiem. Es iedomājos par sevi. Jo tā varētu būt es. Tas varētu būt tu. Ja es pazaudētu draudzību ar labiem draugiem un kolēģiem? Ja es pazaudētu kontaktu ar radiem? Ja mana draudze varētu sašķelties kara dēļ? Es varu vienīgi cerēt, ka manī būtu tāda pati žēlastība un pazemība kā manos draugos.

Es ticu, ka miers atgriezīsies, ka Ukraina atradīs sevi, un ka šīs ciešanas nebūs veltīgas. Bet līdz tam brīdim es sēroju kopā ar tiem, kuri sēro, un lūdzu par dziedināšanu un atjaunošanu.

Sons and daughters… kings and queens of love

It was a hot and humid evening in Kuala Lumpur. Our friend Darren is a good driver and I am glad because the traffic here gets bad. I don’t mind sitting in a passenger seat though when it gives more time for good conversations. And in Malaysia there is lots to talk about. People, the city, music, art, faith, history, current affairs… Darren is a good source for all these topics.

We were driving to a show featuring local bands. Seriously, there is so much musical talent in Malaysia! And the venue was really cool. “Merdekarya” is a combination of words for ‘independence’ and ‘art’. It prides itself for being a place of free expression and creativity and providing platform and support for local poetry, music and storytelling…

One advertisement that stuck in my head from years of watching CNN International news is “Malaysia Truly Asia”. It emphasized the natural beauty and the cultural, ethnic and racial diversity and it had a very catchy tune. I guess this ad worked… at least for me. No doubt it is one of the most diverse places and also this tropical land is one of 17 Megadiverse countries on earth, estimated to have 20% of the world’s animal species.  Most of the country is covered by tropical rain forests.

Malay, Chinese, Indigenous, Indian. I am glad that for my friends, English is a common language. Otherwise I would be lost. Still, I do get lost when they switch to Manglish, a mix of English, Malay, Hokkien, Mandarin, Cantonese, Tamil… wow , they can talk fast! It is like listening on “fast forward”.

Our friend Darren used to teach English to foreign students in Kuala Lumpur. It gave him another deeper insight into cross-cultural living. Especially interesting for me were his observations about young people from the former Soviet republics like Russia, Tajikistan, etc. Most come from wealthy families and many are not as interested in their studies as they are interested in having a good time. Also, Darren had become aware of different prejudices and conflicts between these groups. For example, the prejudice toward people from Central Asian countries. For those of us who grew up in the USSR, all the derogatory terms are so familiar. And here they made it all the way to Malaysia.

I am aware that even in such a beautiful country like Malaysia not everything is ‘paradise’ and the rich cultural social tapestry has its reverse side. The advertisement of Malaysia Truly Asia leaves out these kind of things. There is a history of tensions and from time to time it comes to violence, aimed at ethnic or religious communities. I am no expert on Malaysian history or all the current causes for these fractures, but I do know that there are fault-lines in all our societies.

At the show I was listening to an amazing young band from the south of Malaysia, accordingly named “South and The Lowlands”. Music is a very powerful tool in peace building and reconciliation.  One of their songs “Sculptures” (lyrics by Daniel T.) has a beautiful message and a story to tell that is very relevant to all our lives…

“Many faces and places… Many hopes and dreams shattered                                                              Many hurts and bruises… Many roads and paths taken

Different colours, covered by the same blood… Different shades, but after one heart

Sons and daughters… Kings and queens of love                                                                                      More than sculptures… Crafted by God

Shine bright tonight… One heart… One soul… One mind ”

Malaysia has words, songs and stories to tell the world. I am blessed by friends like Darren and Daniel  and others who are passionate about challenging our prejudices. They use their talents while inspired by faith in God who rains Love, Truth and Forgiveness on everyone – good and bad.

DSCN3126

A must-visit venue in Kuala Lumpur

Latviski:

Kualalumpūrā ir karsts un sutīgs vakars. Mūsu draugs Darens ir labs šoferis, un es to novērtēju, jo te mēdz būt pamatīgi satiksmes sastrēgumi. Turklāt man nav iebildumu būt pasažierim, ja ir daudz laika labām sarunām. Malaizijā ir ko pārrunāt – cilvēki, pilsēta, mūzika, māksla, reliģija, vēsture, jaunākie notikumi… Darens labprāt runā par visām šīm tēmām.

Mēs braucam uz koncertu, kur muzicēs vietējās jaunās grupas. Goda vārds, te ir tik daudz labas mūzikas! Un pats mūzikas klubs ir superīgs. “Merdekarya” ir vārdu salikums, kas malaju valodā nozīmē ‘neatkarība’ un ‘māksla’. Ar to arī šis klubs lepojas, ka veicina un atbalsta neatkarīgo mākslu un vietējos dzejniekus, mūziķus un rakstniekus.

Tā kā daudzus gadus skatos CNN starptautiskās ziņas, tad galvā iesēdies viens reklāmas rullītis. “Malaizija Patiesa Āzija”. Tur tika reklamēts dabas skaistums, un lielā kultūras, etnisko grupu un rasu dažādība. Turklāt šai reklāmai bija ļoti lipīga melodija. Tātad šī kampaņa nostrādāja. Vismaz manā gadījumā. Nav šaubu, ka te ir šī liela dažādība. Turklāt Malaizija ir viena no 17 valstīm pasaulē, kuras tiek uzskatītas par supervalstīm dabas daudzveidības jomā. Te ir apmēram 20% no pasaules dzīvnieku sugām. Lielāko daļu valsts sedz tropu meži.

Malaji, ķīnieši, aborigēni, indieši… Es priecājos, ka mūsu draugi savā starpā sarunājas angļu valodā, savādāk es apjuktu. Es jau tā apjūku vai arī atslēdzos no sarunas, kad viņi pāriet uz vietējo angļu sarunvalodu (Manglish), kur sajaucas angļu, malaju, mandarīnu, tamilu, hokienu un citas valodas. Turklāt viņi runā tādā ātrumā! Liekas, ka kāds būtu ieslēdzis pogu “paātrināt”.

Mūsu draugs Darens agrāk mācīja angļu valodu ārvalstu studentiem, kuri mācās Kualalumpūrā. Viņš daudz ko uzzināja un iepazina dažādas kultūras. Konkrēti mani interesēja stāsti par studentiem no bijušajām PSRS valstīm, piemēram, Krievijas, Tadžikistānas un citām. Lielākā daļa ir bagātu ģimeņu atvases, kuriem gribas ne tik daudz studēt, kā labi pavadīt laiku. Zīmīgi, ka Darens ātri uzķēra dažādos aizspriedumus šo studentu starpā. Piemēram, attieksmi pret tautībām no Centrālās Āzijas. Mums, uzaugušajiem PSRS, šīs iesaukas un citi apzīmējumi ir labi pazīstami, bet tagad tie atceļojuši līdz Malaizijai. Darens man ļoti precīzi izskaidroja, kas ir ‘čurkas’.

Taču es zinu, ka arī skaistajā Malaizijā nav “paradīze”, un krāsainajam sabiedrības tepiķim ir otra neglītā puse. Protams, ka reklāmas rullītis to nerādīs. Arī šeit ir vēsture ar konfliktiem starp rasēm un tautībām un dažādas reliģiskas neiecietības izpausmes, kas reizēm pārvēršas vardarbībā. Skaidrs, ka šīs plaisas ir visur pasaulē.

Koncertā klausījos vienu jaunu un ļoti talantīgu rokgrupu no Malaizijas dienvidiem, kuru attiecīgi sauc “Dienvidi un zemienes” (South and The Lowlands). Mūzika vienmēr ir bijis spēcīgs intruments, ko izmantot miera celšanai. Viena no grupas dziesmām “Skulptūras” pildīja tieši šādu uzdevumu caur savu skaisto vēstījumu…

“Daudzas sejas un vietas… Daudzas cerības un sapņi

Daudzas sāpes un brūces… Daudzi ceļi un gaitas

Daudzas krāsas, ko apklāj vienas asinis… Daudzi toņi, bet viena sirds

Dēli un meitas… Mīlestības valdnieki un valdnieces

Vairāk kā skulptūras… Dieva radītas

Lai deg spoži… Viena sirds… Viena dvēsele… Viens nodoms”

Malaizija dod vārdus, dziesmas un stāstus visai pasaulei. Paldies Dievam par tādiem draugiem kā Darens and Daniēls un citi, kuri cīnās ar mūsu aizspriedumiem. Viņu instruments ir mūzika un māksla, un viņu motivācija ir ticība Dievam, kurš izlej savu Mīlestību, Patiesību un Žēlastību pār mums visiem – labiem un sliktiem.

 

 

 

 

 

Looking at our compass to guide through the EU crisis

For sure I am no expert on the EU but I do know a thing or two. Firstly, most people, including myself, recognize that we are in a serious crisis. You hear it described as ‘existential’. The question of ‘to be or not to be’.

Also, I know that any crisis and pressure – personal or social – exposes and reveals many things. It exposes our inner thoughts, our character and values. Like a piece of fruit, under pressure we crack and ‘juice’ comes out. Is it a bitter lemon or sweet mango? We learn more about each other when things get hard. While the sun is shining, we can be polite, respectful, unselfish and share smile and hugs. When disaster or tragedy strikes, we often react in unexpected ways.

I have noticed this in my own life. I can be quite satisfied with myself when things are easy but during a major challenge or stress I suddenly start thinking, doing and saying things that later make me ashamed. Some of it is normal and healthy but some of it is very ugly and shocking.

Major crisis will often have different results. Some people (and communities and nations) go though it with dignity and it makes them a better person – wiser, gentler, more compassionate, generous and humble while others become worse – foolish, harsh, bitter, proud and aggressive. Or they simply give up on living. This is the age-old mystery for philosophers and spiritual leaders and all of us. Where does the inner strength come from? Where does the courage and wisdom come from when there seems no ‘way through’ or no ‘way forward’?

There is a saying that “Trouble does not come alone” or “When it rains, it pours”. Well, it is pouring trouble right now in Europe. I am sure that for many of the EU leaders it feels like a hurricane (I should not say this since I am writing this blog but I would not want their job). Grexit, Brexit, refugees, border closures, barbed wire fences, Russia, Ukraine, right-wing, left-wing, new tribalism…

Our official EU motto is “United in diversity.” Nobody doubts the ‘diversity’ part but what about the other? Jean-Claude Juncker, the President of the European Commission, said these words in his State of Union address in 2015. “There is not enough Europe in this Union. And there is not enough Union in this Union.” So, we continue to see reactions and actions and many of those have shocked us. I hear this expression a lot, “We are cutting the branch we are sitting on.” What is this branch?

I think of it as our moral compass. There are major directions it is supposed to point to:

Peace and Reconciliation: In 2012, the EU received the Nobel Peace Prize for having “contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy, and human rights in Europe” We have enjoyed peace among the EU member states for many decades and we start to take it for granted. This peace was very hard to accomplish and the reconciliation is still ongoing. Again and again we forget that if France and Germany did not reconcile, we would not have any European integration. It is also important to know and to remember that the political leaders who made these courageous decisions, were very much inspired by their religious beliefs and values.

Humanity and Human Rights: One of the high expectations of anyone who lives in Europe and those who come here is the emphasis on dignity and worth of every individual human being. Again it has spiritual roots – human beings made in the image of God. European Convention on Human Rights was adopted in 1950. It is a  “living instrument” which means that it incorporates changes in law and society. It is legally binding for 47 European countries, not just the EU. Also, we have the European Court of Human Rights with possibly the highest success rate in the world. It is understandable why in so many interviews, the refugees and asylum seekers who have experienced mistreatment on our soil complain, “We thought that Europe is the place where human rights are respected.”

Common good and Solidarity: This is one of the most challenging principles of our supranational institutions. The idea that we share all the responsibilities and obligations as much as the privileges. The idea that bigger and stronger ones cannot take advantage of smaller and weaker ones. Again and again we see our solidarity tested and often we fail. The critics will say that it is humanly impossible; that nations are too selfish and greedy because we are human. It is true and that is why holding ourselves accountable to the goal of common good is existential.

Freedom and Democracy: There are certain standards that countries need to achieve before they can become members of the EU. Latvia had to do its own homework for the privilege of joining. What was required?  A stable democracy that respects human rights and the rule of law. It was not easy and it still a work in progress but we have come a long way. Freedom has to be learned and lived. Tunne Kelam, MEP from Estonia, says, “True freedom is not arbitrary or aimless. True freedom is to reach truth and common good. “As we can see from so many examples around the world, it takes time and lots of political will.

Time of crisis is time for great opportunity. I agree with the words of Tomáš Halík, the Czech philosopher, priest and theologian. “We need great Europeans with spiritual strength, intellectual vitality and practical thinking. … European democracy needs European ‘demos’.”

 

53d9d93cdcd5888e145a6d35_maphead-center-europe-purnuskes-lithuania

Geographical center of Europe in Lithuania (photo from the Internet)

Latviski:

Katrā ziņā neesmu eksperte Eiropas Savienības jautājumos, tomēr šo to saprotu. Pirmkārt,  ir skaidrs, ka mēs piedzīvojam ļoti smagu krīzi. Daudzi to raksturo kā ‘eksistenciālu’. Tātad tiek uzdots jautājums – būt vai nebūt?

Vēl es zinu to, ka katra krīze un izaicinājums izgaismo un atklāj daudzas lietas. Gan personiskajā, gan sabiedrības dzīvē. Krīzes izgaismo mūsu dziļākās domas, raksturu un vērtības. Kā auglis, kuru saspiežot, iztek sula, arī mēs zem liela spiediena izrādam savu iekšieni. Vai esam skābs citrons vai salds mango? Mēs uzzinām viens par otru vairāk, kad iet grūti. Kad saule spīd, ir viegli būt pieklājīgiem, pazemīgiem, nesavtīgiem, un smaidīt, un apkampties. Kad problēmas vai nelaime, mēs bieži vien reaģējam pilnīgi neparedzētā veidā.

Es neesmu nekāds izņēmums. Kad man iet viegli un labi, esmu diezgan apmierināta ar sevi. Kad nonāku grūtos un sarežģītos apstākļos, pēkšņi sāku domāt, darīt un runāt lietas, ko pēc tam nožēloju vai par kurām kaunos. Daļēji tas ir normāli, veselīgi un cilvēcīgi, bet daļēji tas ir neglīti un šokējoši.

Krīzes noved pie dažādiem rezultātiem. Ir cilvēki (un kopienas un nācijas), kuri iet cauri grūtībām ar cilvēcisku cieņu un drosmi, un kļūst labāki – gudrāki, mierīgāki, žēlsirdīgāki, dāsnāki, pazemīgāki – , bet citi kļūst sliktāki – muļķīgāki, sarūgtināti, mazāk žēlsirdīgi, vēl skopāki, dusmīgi un agresīvi. Vai vienkārši pārstāj dzīvot pilnvērtīgu dzīvi. Tas ir tas lielais un mūžīgais noslēpums, ko cauri gadsimtiem mēģina izprast gudrie un vienkāršie. No kurienes nāk šis iekšējais spēks? No kurienes nāk gudrība un drosme atrast izeju no strupceļa jeb bezizejas?

Ir tāds teiciens, ka nelaime jeb problēma nenāk viena. Vai arī, kad līst, tad gāž. Nu, Eiropā gāžas pamatīgs ‘problēmu’ lietus. Varbūt daudziem ES vadītājiem liekas, ka pat orkāns. Lai gan rakstu, jo neesmu pret šīm lietām vienaldzīga, teikšu godīgi, ka negribētu būt viņu amatos šajā brīdī. Brexit, Grexit, patvēruma meklētāji, aizvērtas robežas, dzeloņdrāšu žogi, Krievija, Ukraina, galēji labējie, galēji kreisie, pašizolēšanās…

Mūsu oficiālā ES devīze ir “Vienoti dažādībā”. Neviens nešaubās par dažādību, bet kā ar to otro? Žans Klods Junkers, Eiropas Komisijas presidents, savā runā par Eiropas Savienības stāvokli 2015. gadā teica šādus vārdus. “Šajā Savienībā ir par maz Eiropas. Un šajā Savienībā ir par maz Savienības.” Mēs turpinam vērot eiropiešu dažādās reakcijas, darbības, vārdus, un daudz kas mūs šokē. Bieži dzirdu frāzi, ka paši zāģējam zaru, uz kura sēžam.

Uz kā tad mēs sēžam? Es to sauktu par mūsu morālo kompasu. Atļaušos atgādināt dažus no virzieniem, uz kuriem šim kompasam jānorāda.

Miers un izlīgums: 2012. gadā Eiropas Savienība saņēma Nobela Miera prēmiju par ieguldījumiem sešu desmitgažu garumā, veicinot mieru, izlīgumu, demokrātiju un cilvēktiesības. Mēs esam baudījuši šo mieru tik ilgi, ka esam jau pie tā pieraduši, un bieži vien pienācīgi nenovērtējam. Šo mieru nebija viegli sasniegt, un izlīguma process vēl daudzviet turpinās. Mēs piemirstam, ka, ja Francija un Vācija nebūtu izlīgušas, nekādas Eiropas integrācijas nebūtu. Vēl ir svarīgi atcerēties, ka tā laika politiķus un viņu drosmīgos lēmumus iedvesmoja viņu reliģiskā pārliecība.

Cilvēcīgums un cilvēktiesības: Viena no lietām, ko mēs sagaidām, dzīvojot vai pat tikai viesojoties Eiropā, ir cieņa pret katru individuālo cilvēku. Arī tam ir garīgs un morāls pamats – uzskats, ka katrs cilvēks ir īpašs un vērtīgs, jo radīts Dieva līdzībā. Eiropas Cilvēktiesību Konvencija tika pieņemta 1950. gadā, un tā seko izmaiņām likumos un sabiedrībā. To ir parakstījušas 47 valstis Eiropā, tātad ne tikai ES dalībvalstis. Vēl mums ir Eiropas Cilvēktiesību Tiesa, kas darbojas ar lieliem panākumiem. Tāpēc ir viegli saprast, kāpēc tik daudzās intervijās ar patvēruma meklētājiem, kuri piedzīvojuši sliktu apiešanos vai cilvēktiesību pārkāpumus, var dzirdēt vārdus – mēs sagaidījām, ka Eiropa ir tā vieta, kur tiek ievērotas cilvēku tiesības.

Kopīgais labums un solidaritāte: Šķiet, ka te ir vislielākais izaicinājums mūsu pārnacionālajām (supranacionālajām) attiecībām un institūcijām. Ideja un ideāls, ka mēs dalām pienākumus un atbildību, ne tikai privilēģijas un labumus. Ideāls, ka lielākie un stiprākie nevar izmantot mazākos un vājākos. Šī kopība tiek nemitīgi pārbaudīta, un mēs bieži atkrītam. Kritiķi un skeptiķi teiks, ka šis ideāls vispār nav sasniedzams, jo nācijas ir pārāk egoistiskas un mantkārīgas, jo tās vada vienkārši cilvēki. Tā ir realitāte, un tāpēc ir tik svarīgi pašiem turēt šo latiņu augstu un negrozāmu, lai domātu par kopīgo, nevis tikai savējo labumu. Savādāk varam iet katrs savā viensētā, un celt savus žogus.

Brīvība un demokrātija: Lai kļūtu par ES dalībvalsti, ir jāparakstās zem šīm politiskajām tradīcijām un brīvības un likuma mantojuma. Latvijai bija jāveic liels mājasdarbs, lai iegūtu šo privilēģiju. Kas tika pieprasīts? Stabila demokrātija, kur tiek ievērotas cilvēktiesības un likums. To sasniegt nebija tik vienkārši, un mums daudz kas vēl jāuzlabo, bet esam nogājuši  lielu ceļa gabalu. Brīvību ir jāmācās un jāpraktizē. Tune Kelams, padomju laika disidents un šobrīd EP deputāts no Igaunijas, atgādina, ka “Brīvība nav nejauša vai bezmērķīga. Patiesa brīvība ved uz patiesību un kopīgo labumu.” Kā mēs varam secināt no daudziem starptautiskiem piemēriem, ir vajadzīgs laiks un stipra politiska griba.

Jebkura krīze ir arī laiks lielām iespējām. Piekrītu Tomašam Halikam, čehu filozofam, katoļu priesterim un teologam, ka “mums vajadzīgi eiropieši ar garīgu spēku, intelektuālu enerģiju un praktisko domāšanu. … Eiropas demokrātijai ir vajadzīgs eiropeisks demos.”