By losing our neighbors we lose a part of ourselves

I continue to reflect on my recent trip to Ukraine. Particularly the city of Lutsk, the regional center of Volyn province. It is a very nice, slow paced city in northwestern part of Ukraine with very fascinating story. It has a beautiful old castle and lots of other interesting cultural, historical and architectural sights.

But there was a day when I got very sad. In fact I was grieving. We walked around the historical center of Lutsk and I realized what a multicultural and multi faith place it used to be. Many of the places of worship are still there but it is only a shadow of the former things. You can still feel and see the tragedy of the destructive wars of 20th century and the intentional neglect of the Soviet years.

There is a beautiful old Roman Catholic Cathedral named after St.Peter and St.Paul and built in the 17th century. It used to have a Jesuit college where education was free and conducted at a high level. Inside the church I saw many Polish names and later found out that in 1939, about 34% of the population of Lutsk city was Polish. After the war, the Soviet regime closed the church and later it was even the Museum of Atheism.

There is another church building, originally Lutheran. It was built in 1907 as the principal place of worship for the Germans living in Volyn. The church fell into decline as a result of the Second World War. Then for many decades it was used as an archive. (The Soviets were very practical when it came to using the church buildings. If not a museum for atheism or science, most became storehouses.)

And then I found the Great Synagogue, completed in 1629. Located in what used to be the Jewish quarter, it was the religious, educational and community centre of Lutsk. Again the tragedy which destroyed this community and this temple was the Second World War and the Holocaust. In 1939, the city’s population was 40% Jewish. In December 1941 the Łuck Ghetto was established. In August and September 1942, about 17,000 prisoners of the ghetto were killed. After the war the synagogue stood empty. Then came another practical Soviet idea –  it was reconstructed as a movie-house and a gym.

I was thinking about these tragedies and brutal Nazi and Soviet regimes, changing the fate of community and the face of the city completely. Old neighbors were gone and new neighbors moved in. I know that this is the story of so many places (too many) but somehow Lutsk really broke my heart.

It felt like there is still a big, open wound which needs healing and redemption and restoration. I believe as Ukraine is defining its national identity, the story of its rich multicultural and multi faith heritage needs to be told and reminded.

It has a lot of parallels with my own nation of Latvia and other places around the world which used to be much more multicultural before wars and conflicts that drive people out of their home. In the past or in the present.

I grieve. We all should.

dscn3831

The Great Synagogue of Lutsk. Currently a gym.

Latvian:

Joprojām ir daudz ko pārdomāt pēc nesenā brauciena uz Ukrainu. Īpaši par Lucku, Voliņas apgabala centru. Jauka, lēna, mierīga pilsēta Ukrainas rietumos, un tai ir ļoti interesants stāsts. Ir arī skaista, veca pils un daudz citu kultūras un vēstures pieminekļu.

Man tur bija visai neparasta diena. Diena, kurā pārņēma skumjas. Pat tādas kā sēras. Mēs ar vīru staigājām pa Luckas vecpilsētu, un es aptvēru, cik multikulturāla un multireliģiska bija šī pilsēta savā pirmskara dzīvē. Daudzi no dievnamiem vēl pastāv, bet no šīs raibās kopienas ir palikusi tikai ēna. Joprojām pāri kā neredzams palags ir pagājušā gadsimta karu sekas, un padomju laika apzināta vēstures aizmiršana.

Te stāv skaistā Sv.Pētera un Sv.Pāvila Romas Katoļu katedrāle, uzcelta ap 1630. gadu. Agrāk tur darbojās jezuītu dibināta koledža, kurā izglītība bija par brīvu, turklāt augstā līmenī. Uz katedrāles sienām ir daudz poļu vārdu un uzvārdu, un vēlāk uzzināju, ka vēl 1939. gadā apmēram 34% iedzivotāju bija poļu tautības. Pēckara gados padomju režīms aizslēdza draudzi, un pat izveidoja Ateisma muzeju.

Vēl stāv bijusī luterāņu baznīca. Celta 1907. gadā, lai kļūtu par galveno pulcēšanās un draudzes vietu Voliņas vāciešiem. Arī šis dievnams padomju laikos tika nolaists un izmantots kā arhīvs un noliktava. (Kā jau zinām, komunisti atrada ļoti praktisku pielietojumu šādām ēkām.)

Pavisam netālu es atradu tā saukto Lielo sinagogu. Pabeigta 1629. gadā, tā atradās bijušajā jūdu kvartālā, un kalpoja kā reliģijas, izglītības un kopienas centrs. Tā pati traģēdija – Otrais Pasaules karš un tad Holokausts – iznīcināja gan šo kopienu, gan šo pielūgsmes vietu. Pirms kara ap 40% pilsētas centra iedzīvotāju bija ebreji. 1941. gada decembrī tika izveidots Luckas geto, un nākamā gada augustā un septembrī apmēram 17,000 geto ieslodzīto tika nogalināti. Sinagoga stāvēja tukša, līdz padomju varai atkal radās ideja  tur ierīkot kino un sporta zāli. (Tagad tur ir fitnesa centrs.)

Es domāju par šo lielo traģēdiju, kas pilnībā pārmainīja gan pilsētas, gan kopienu seju. Agrākie kaimiņi tika padzīti vai iznīcināti,  jauni kaimiņi sāka dzīvot to vietā. Protams, ne jau Luckai vienīgajai tāds stāsts, bet nez kāpēc tas man šoreiz riktīgi aizķēra sirdi.

Tāda sajūta, ka šī dziļā rēta vēl stāv vaļā. Vēl nav pilnībā dziedināta un atjaunota šī pilsēta. Šobrīd, kad Ukraina un tās cilvēki tik strauji meklē savu nacionālo identitāti, šo stāstu par daudzajām kultūrām un ticībām un kopienām vajag stāstīt, atgādināt un iekļaut savējā.

Jo zaudējot savus kaimiņus, mēs visi zaudējām daļu no sevis pašiem.

This one goes out to Brussels

So, this week I was away from the Internet for a few days and quite enjoyed it. No Donald Trump, no Apple and FBI, no crisis, no war, no bad news… actually no news. I was teaching in a remote place on Thailand – Myanmar border, surrounded by farms, villages and beautiful mountains. I enjoyed the sound of roosters, dogs barking and some of my new friends singing while they are taking a shower or working outside. All I had to worry about was making sure my mosquito net was fully tucked in at night.

Whenever I am away from the Internet for more than three days while traveling, my greatest fear is that someone in my family will get hurt or even die and I will find out much later. I make sure my relatives have our phone number in Thailand or wherever but they still prefer to contact me through social media. Little frustrating but this is how it goes.

Life is a mysterious thing with lots of irony. I left my peaceful surroundings to find out that indeed somebody has died. Not in my family but in many other families. People in Belgium and other countries have lost their loved ones because of a senseless act of violence. Even the families of the suicide bombers have lost their loved ones – these guys were somebody’s sons and brothers and cousins. Evil does not discriminate, it destroys everyone in its path. It has no preferred race, gender or religion.

Another irony was that during those days I was teaching about peace building and reconciliation. Even using Europe Union as an example of peace and stability and how in 2012 it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for “over six decades [having] contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe.” Of course, I told my students that Europeans are not perfect and there are many issues and challenges but we have come a long way from being a continent of constant wars and feuds.

I really did not want to hear such bad news. Not from Brussels or anywhere else. Not from Istanbul, not from Ankara, not from Baghdad, not from Paris, not from cities in Pakistan or Nigeria or Yemen. Each place where people experience this kind of evil, is traumatized and the scars remain. Life is not the same anymore…

Life is not the same for people in Belgium. It is not the same to go to the metro and to think that so many people did not reach the next station. Did not reach their job, their school, their family. It will not be the same to go back to Brussels airport and to think that the anticipation of travel and joy of having a vacation turned out to be ‘the wrong place at the wrong time.’

I am very sorry. Words fall short at such a time as this.

But I am also more than ever determined to continue to walk the road of peace. I do not mean being naive or singing “We are the world, we are the children” and proclaiming that some kind of positive thinking will take these evil things away. Evil is real and people make really evil choices. At the same time I will not join those who will find the fix-it-all solution in violence and declare “Nuke them all!”

Many have already written and many others will write articles and expert opinions about Belgium. There is plenty of blame to go around and people who are most affected will deal with their grief in many ways.

I don’t know if this was planned on Easter week or it was simply a chosen date. It does not matter. But it matters to me that Easter events from so long ago deal with exactly this kind of human experience. The Light came into the darkness and there was a moment when the darkness celebrated a victory. But its victory was short lived.

The Light is risen indeed. It is back with a universe-changing kind of force and the first words we –  the frightened, the bruised, the hopeless, the grieving – hear is “Do not be afraid. Peace be with you!”

12

Title photo from the Internet; this one is mine.

Latviski:

Tas nenotiek pārāk bieži, ka varu atpūsties no interneta, bet pagājušajā nedēļā tādas bija vairākas dienas. Nekāda Donalda Trampa, nekādu strīdu starp Apple un ASV drošības dienestiem, nekādu karu, nekādu sliktu ziņu… vienkārši nekādu ziņu. Man bija jāpasniedz lekcijas nomaļā ciematā netālu no Taizemes – Mjanmas robežas, kur apkārt ir tikai lauki, mazi miestiņi un džungļiem klāti kalni. Varēju klausīties vistu kladzināšanā, suņu rejās un manu draugu dziesmās, kamēr viņi strādā vai mazgājas. Vienīgais, par ko bija jāuztraucas vakaros, vai odu tīkls virs gultas ir kārtīgi noslēgts.

Pārbraucienu un darba laikā, kad neesmu tikusi pie interneta ilgāk kā trīs dienas, visvairāk uztraucos par to, ka kāds mans radinieks varētu ciest negadījumā vai pēkšņi nomirt, un es to uzzinātu krietni vēlāk. (Esmu bijusi līdzīgā situācijā.) Prombūtnē no Latvijas vienmēr iedodu radiem savu telefona numuru Taizemē vai kur citur, bet vienalga viņi parasti komunicē caur soctīkliem. Tas mazliet kaitina, bet ko padarīsi.

Dzīvē ir daudz noslēpumu un ironijas. Es atstāju savu ‘miera ostu’ pierobežā un, atgriežoties pilsētā, uzzināju, ka kāds tiešām ir miris. Tikai ne manā ģimenē. Cilvēki Beļģijā un citās valstīs ir zaudējuši savus mīļos caur briesmīgu vardarbību. Arī pašnāvnieku spridzinātāju ģimenes ir zaudējušas savējos mīļos – šie puiši bija kādam dēli, brāļi un brālēni. Ļaunums nav diskrimējošs; tas iznīcina visu savā ceļā. Tas nešķiro pēc rases, dzimuma vai reliģijas.

Visdziļākā ironija man personīgi bija tas, ka manas lekcijas bija veltītas miera celšanas un izlīguma tēmai. Es pat izmantoju Eiropas Savienību kā piemēru, un minēju 2012. gadā piešķirto Nobela Miera prēmiju  par miera un izlīguma, demokrātijas un cilvēktiesību veicināšanu Eiropā. Protams, es skaidroju studentiem, ka eiropieši nav perfekti, un mums ir daudz problēmu un izaicinājumu, bet mēs tomēr esam pielikuši daudz pūliņu, lai pārveidotu šo karojošo kontinentu par reģionu, kur valda miers.

Es tiešām negribēju dzirdēt šādas sliktas ziņas. Ne no Briseles, ne no citurienes. Ne no Stambulas, ne no Ankāras, ne no Bagdādes, ne no Parīzes, ne no pilsētām Pakistānā vai Nigērijā vai Jemenā. Katra vieta, kas piedzīvo šādu ļaunumu, ir dziļi traumēta, un šīs rētas paliek. Dzīve vairs nav tāda kā agrāk…

Dzīve Beļģijā ir mainījusies. Tagad, ejot uz metro staciju, tu iedomāsies par tiem, kuri nesasniedza savu nākamo pieturu. Kuri nesasniedza savu darbu, vai skolu, vai mājas. Braucot uz Briseles lidostu tu iedomāsies par tiem, kuriem ceļojuma prieka un brīvdienu baudas vietā bija tā nelaime atrasties “neīstajā vietā un neīstajā brīdī.”

Man patiešām ļoti žēl. Nav vārdu, kas to var līdz galam aprakstīt.

Bet man ir vēl viena reakcija. Šī traģēdija man palīdz vēl vairāk un skaidrāk apņemties turpināt savu darbu miera celšanas jomā. Es negribu, lai mēs būtu naivi, vai vienkārši, rokās sadevušies, dziedātu dziesmiņas, ka esam “pasaule un pasaules bērni”, vai sludinātu, ka pozitīvā domāšana palīdzēs atvairīt visus ļaunos uzbrukumus, vai arī par tiem nedomāt. Ļaunums ir reāls, un cilvēki izvēlas darīt ļaunas lietas. Tajā pašā laikā es nepievienošos otrai nometnei, kas atrod vienkāršu vardarbīgu risinājumu – uzspridzināt viņus visus!

Daudzi jau ir izteikušies, un vēl daudzi rakstīs savas domas un ekspertu atzinumus par Beļģiju, par Eiropu. Tiks meklēti vainīgie, tiks meklētas atbildes, un cilvēki, kuri cieta vistiešākajā veidā, izrādīs savas sēras dažādos veidos.

Es nezinu, vai šie uzbrukumi tika plānoti Lieldienu nedēļas laikā ar nolūku, vai arī tas bija vienkārši izdevīgs datums. Tam nav nozīmes. Bet nozīme ir patiesībai, ka vēsturiskie Lieldienu notikumi aprakstīja mūsu cilvēces pieredzi. Gaisma nāca tumsā, un bija brīdis Golgātas kalnā, kad tumsa svinēja uzvaru. Bet šī uzvara bija ļoti īsa.

Gaisma ir patiesi augšāmcēlusies. Tā atgriezās ar spēku, kas izmaina visu universu, un pirmie vārdi, ko mēs, nobijušies, sāpināti, cerību un ticību labā uzvarai zaudējuši un sērās, izdzirdam, ir “Nebaidieties! Miers ar jums!”

 

 

It could be me, it could be you…

I want to talk about Ukraine in a very personal way and this story starts in Thailand… of all places.

My former home in Chiang Mai was in a small and quiet neighborhood close to Chiang Mai University. There were not many foreigners living there. So, when a foreign family moved in, everyone took notice. I have one of those habits of trying to guess where people are from. My husband and I would look at each other and say, “what do you think? American, British, German?” I saw this new family walking down our street and I said, “Definitely from eastern Europe.”

And then I heard them speak Russian. And then I finally introduced myself and found out that our new neighbors were from Ukraine. (Not born there but it is too long to explain how people moved around in the former Soviet Republics.) David is an astronomer who works for an Observatory and has looked through some of the biggest telescopes in the world. His job is very fascinating but I still don’t remember the name of the specific space objects he researches and teaches about. His wife Sveta and their two children adjusted to the new life in a country far far away from home. I was glad to practice Russian and they were mutually glad to speak their mother tongue.

In 2013 they went to Ukraine for a holiday and family visits and I remember Sveta’s worried look after they came back. I had been following the news of unrest and people’s protests in Kiev and asked them what was going on. Sveta was very anxious and said that if things continued like that, there could be a civil war. I realized at that moment that for me it was an interest but for her it was very personal.

This is what I want to talk about. The personal tragedy of war and conflicts. The deepest tragedy of it, besides death and destruction, is the broken and destroyed relationships. Between friends, colleagues, relatives, siblings, families, even spouses… and, of course, nations.

I remember talking to David many months later when the conflict had become violent, Crimea annexed by Russia, the war in two eastern provinces had started and the propaganda campaign was in full swing. Of course, he was very emotional and clearly and understandably angry about many things, but the deepest pain and grief was the loss of friends. Not physically but relationally. Some of his good friends and colleagues in Russia and Crimea were now on the ‘opposite side’ and held strongly to beliefs that Ukraine is turning into a fascist state and that Putin is the savior with the best intentions.

David described this pain as similar to grieving over someone’s death. And he is not the only one. There are thousands, even millions of people who have experienced this grief and loss. I have met other Ukrainians with the same story. It is hard to imagine two other nations that used to be as closely connected as Ukraine and Russia. Through culture, history, economy, religion, family ties. Thousands of intermarried families who never used to think in terms of their nationalities. So many Ukrainians have relatives in Russia and vice versa.

Now there are countless families that don’t even talk to each other, that have cut off any contact. One young family I also met in Chiang Mai were serving as volunteers at an orphanage in Thailand. Their hometown in Ukraine is Kharkiv. In her youth, Yulia lived in Crimea and she has her own perspective on the challenges and situation but her aunts who live in Russia and used to call her all the time, now have stopped calling.

Yulia also had a story of being at the post office in her home town during the early days of the conflict and some people getting upset because her little daughter had hair ribbons with the colors of Ukraine national flag. The hostility and anger was very real and scary. She was helped by another customer who got them out of the situation. I can only imagine what a trauma it was for her little girl. Because of hair ribbons!

And one more story. During a visit to Minneapolis, USA I met an older gentleman, Viktor who is an active member of local Russian speaking Pentecostal church. He was born in Ukraine, came from a pastor’s family and was very much a patriot of his birthplace. This church in Twin Cities was very multinational – people from all over former Soviet Union who were united by their faith in God and worship in Russian language. Then the war in Ukraine started and the church was very active in praying for peace and sending aid to afflicted people. Viktor told me about his personal pain how the church was affected by it all. He said, “When we started praying for Ukraine, there were church members who said that they will leave the church if we keep supporting Ukraine.” I asked how they responded to this and he replied, “Well, we tried to talk. We decided that we need to sit down and listen to each other and seek unity as Christians above all else.”

When I pray for peace in Ukraine, I think about David, Sveta, Yulia, Viktor and many others. I think about myself. It could have been me. It could have been you. What if I lost friendship with my colleagues? What if I lost contact with my relatives? What if my church was splitting because of war? How would I respond? I hope that I would respond with as much grace and humility as my friends have.

I believe that peace will come, that Ukraine will find its identity and the suffering will not be in vain. Meanwhile I grieve with those who are grieving and pray for a time of healing and restoration.

world_06_temp-1394954216-53254fe8-620x348

Photos from the Internet

Latviski:

Es gribu pastāstīt ko ļoti personīgu par Ukrainu, un, kas to būtu domājis, ka stāsts iesāksies Taizemē.

Mana agrākā dzīves vieta Čangmai pilsētā bija mazā un mierīgā rajonā netālu no lielākās universitātes. Tur nebija daudz ārzemnieku, tāpēc katrs iebraucējs tika ievērots un novērots. Man arī piemīt tāds ieradums novērot cilvēkus un mēģināt uzminēt, kādas tautības viņi ir. Sava veida derības ar vīru, kad viens otram jautājam – kā tu domā, no kurienes viņi ir? Amerikāņi, briti, vācieši? Mūsu mazajā ieliņā ievēroju kādu jaunu ģimeni, un uzreiz ‘secināju’ – viņi ir Austrumeiropas.

Un tad viņi pagāja man garām, un izdzirdēju krievu valodu. Līdz kādu dienu saņēmos (tādi mēs, eiropieši, esam) un iepazinos. Izrādījās, ka jaunie kaimiņi ir no Ukrainas. Dzimuši gan Gruzijā un Kazahstānā, bet mums, Latvijā, ir saprotams, kā cilvēki pārvietojās bijušajā PSRS darba un studiju dēļ. Dāvids ir astronoms, un strādā Taizemes galvenajā observatorijā. Viņš ir pētījis Visuma brīnumus caur daudziem pasaules lielākajiem teleskopiem, un ilgus gadus strādāja Krimas observatorijā. Es klausos ar milzīgu interesi, bet vienalga nevaru atcerēties nosaukumu tieši tiem objektiem, ko viņš pēta, un par ko pasniedz augstskolās. Viņa sieva Svetlana ar bērniem pamazām pielāgojās dzīvei šajā svešajā valstī tālu no mājām. Es biju priecīga, ka varēju atjaunot savas krievu valodas zināšanas, un bērni bija bezgala priecīgi, ka kāds viņus saprot.

Viņi devās uz Ukrainu nelielā atvaļinājumā pie radiem 2013. gada beigās. Atceros, cik Svetlana bija bēdīga pēc šīs ciemošanās. Apmēram zināju par protestiem Kijevā, cik nu no ziņām var uzzināt un izprast, tāpēc jautāju, kas tur notiek. Sveta ļoti negribīgi atbildēja, ka viņai bail no pilsoņu kara. Tajā brīdī es aptvēru, ka man tā ir vienkārši interese, bet viņai tās ir mājas, radi un draugi.

Par to arī ir šis stāsts. Par šo personisko traģēdiju, ko izraisa karš un konflikti. Visdziļākā sāpe, neskaitot nāvi un sabrukumu, ir izjauktas un iznīcinātas attiecības. Starp draugiem, kolēģiem, radiem, brāļiem un māsām, ģimenēm, pat dzīvesbiedriem un, protams, tautām un valstīm.

Pēc vairākiem mēnešiem runāju ar Dāvidu. Spriedze jau bija pāraugusi vardarbībā, Krievija bija anektējusi Krimu, austrumu provincēs bija sācies bruņots konflikts, un informatīvais karš bija uzņēmis milzīgus apgriezienus. Dāvids runāja ļoti emocionāli, un es varēju saprast viņa dusmas, bet viņā lielākā un dziļākā sāpe bija zaudētie draugi. Ne jau fiziski zaudēti, bet pārrautas attiecības. Daudzi no viņa labākajiem draugiem Krievijā un Krimā tagad bija “pretējā pusē”, un stingri turējās pie savas pārliecības, ka Ukrainā valda fašisti, un vienīgi Putins glābj situāciju un cilvēkus.

Dāvids teica, ka viņš sērojot. It kā kāds būtu nomiris, un vairs nav. Un viņš nebija vienīgais šajās sērās. Tūkstošiem, pat miljoniem cilvēku piedzīvo šo sāpi un zaudējumu. Esmu satikusi citus ukraiņus, kuriem līdzīgs stāsts. Mēs taču zinām, ka bija grūti iedomāties vēl tuvākas un ciešākas attiecības starp divām tautām un nācijām kā Ukraina un Krievija. Visas iespējamās saites – kultūra, valoda, vēsture, ekonomika, reliģija, radi. Tūkstošiem kopā savītu ģimeņu, kur agrāk nešķiroja pēc tautības. Tik daudziem ukraiņiem ir radi Krievijā, un krieviem Ukrainā.

Tagad ir neskaitāmas ģimenes, kur vairs nesazinās viens ar otru, kur šīs radu saites ir pārrautas. Vēl viena jauna ģimene, ko satiku Čangmai, bija atbraukuši uz gadu kā brīvprātīgie palīgi nelielā bērnunamā. Viņu mājas Ukrainā ir Harkivā. Savos pusaudzes gados Jūlija bija dzīvojusi Krimā, un viņai bija savs skats gan uz notikumu attīstību, gan situāciju, bet viņas tantes, kuras dzīvoja Krievijā un agrāk bieži zvanīja, jo ir vecas un vientuļas, bija pārstājušas zvanīt.

Vēl Jūlija pastāstīja kādu epizodi pasta nodaļā Harkivā, kas notika pašā konflikta sākumā. Viena daļa cilvēku bija sadusmojušies, jo viņas mazajai meitiņai matos bija lentītes Ukrainas karoga krāsās. Situācija kļuva visai draudīga, līdz viens svešs vīrietis viņas aizstāvēja un izveda laukā no pasta ēkas. Varu iedomāties, ko juta mazā meitene. Matu lentīšu dēļ!

Un pēdējais piemērs. Ciemojoties Amerikas Savienotajās Valstīs, Mineapolē es satiku kādu vecāku vīru Viktoru, kurš bija aktīvs vietējās krievvalodīgās Vasarssvētku draudzes loceklis. Dzimis Ukrainā un uzaudzis mācītāja ģimenē, Viktors bija liels savas dzimtās zemes patriots. Šī konkrētā draudze bija ļoti starpnacionāla – cilvēki no visām bijušajām PSRS republikām, kurus vienoja ticība Jēzum un pielūgsme krievu valodā. Tad sākās karš Ukrainā, un draudze no visas sirds aizlūdza un sūtīja palīdzību cietušiem cilvēkiem. Viktors man atklāja savu lielāko rūpi. Viņš teica – kad mēs sākām aizlūgt par Ukrainu, bija draudzes locekļi, kuri teica, ka iešot prom no draudzes, ja mēs atbalstīsim Ukrainu. Es jautāju, kā viņi to centās atrisināt, un atbilde bija – caur sarunām un dialogu un pārdomām par to, kas mūs, kristiešus, vieno.

Kad es lūdzu Dievam par mieru Ukrainā, es iedomājos par Dāvidu, Svetu, Jūliju, Viktoru un pārējiem. Es iedomājos par sevi. Jo tā varētu būt es. Tas varētu būt tu. Ja es pazaudētu draudzību ar labiem draugiem un kolēģiem? Ja es pazaudētu kontaktu ar radiem? Ja mana draudze varētu sašķelties kara dēļ? Es varu vienīgi cerēt, ka manī būtu tāda pati žēlastība un pazemība kā manos draugos.

Es ticu, ka miers atgriezīsies, ka Ukraina atradīs sevi, un ka šīs ciešanas nebūs veltīgas. Bet līdz tam brīdim es sēroju kopā ar tiem, kuri sēro, un lūdzu par dziedināšanu un atjaunošanu.

Why is Angelina Jolie causing a traffic jam in Battambang?

It turns out I have a few things in common with Angelina Jolie. She is in Cambodia and I am, too. She was in Battambang and I was there, too. She was shopping at the Night Market in Siem Reap and I was, too. She is researching the Khmer Rouge regime and the genocide of 1975-79 and I am, too.

I guess that is where our commonalities end. She is spending much more money and actually making an important movie about the history of Khmer Rouge, based on the autobiography “First They Killed My Father”, written by a survivor Loung Ung. Angelina Jolie has been interested in Cambodia for years and one of her sons was adopted from here. So, obviously with such a high-profile global celebrity in town, the people of Battambang have noticed the presence of film crews and other entourage.

I visited the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum in Phnom Penh, the capital city of Cambodia. It is a sobering place. The Khmer Rouge (or Red Khmer) were a very radical Communist group with a utopian idea of restructuring the whole society. To create a class-less society,  they turned against education, religion, private ownership and any kind of freedom. Here are some of their slogans: “If you wish to get a Baccalaureate, you have to get it at dams or canals” or “Study is not important. What’s important is work and revolution.” (Mind you, many of the leaders were highly educated and had studied in Paris. Including Pol Pot himself.) The cities were emptied and the whole country was turned into a big labor camp with starving and suffering people. Almost 2 million died.

The Tuol Sleng or Security Prison 21 (S-21) had been one of the best high schools in the city before it became a place of torture. This was a special prison for mostly Khmer Rouge cadres and their families and many other random people. Approx 17, 000 people were held, tortured and killed in this place. The torture was meant to extract ‘confessions’ of what kind of traitor are you and who are you spying for – Americans (CIA) or Russians (KGB)? Men, women, teenagers and children, even babies… all were killed.

IMG_0909

The Khmer Rouge had photographed every victim at the time of arrest and many after their executions. Now there are thousands of photos of faces… smiling, sad, angry, confused, beaten, hopeful, hopeless and scared. I look at these faces and I think, it could have been me since I was born in the 70s. These could have been my parents, my grandparents, my brothers. I was fortunate to be born in Latvia and they were unfortunate to be born here.

I met on the survivors of this horrible place. His name is Bou Meng and he is 72 now. What saved him? His skill of painting and ability to draw portraits of the Khmer Rouge leaders. His wife and two young children perished. Bou Meng has written his testimony and advocates for justice and truthful remembering of Cambodia’s past.

One researcher said, “Wartime brutality, Marxist fanaticism, obsessive and threatened nationalism – these seemed to be three of the principal elements that had contributed to this totalitarianism. … I was disturbed not by the banality of evil but the intellectual pretensions behind it.” Words to reflect upon since these kind of ‘intellectual pretensions’ still exist. How to vaccinate yourself against it?

And no, I did not meet Angelina Jolie… but I will be waiting to see her new movie.

IMG_0931

Meeting Bou Meng, one of the survivors of S-21

Latviski:

Izrādās, ka man un Andželīnai Džolijai ir šis tas kopīgs. Viņa ir Kambodžā, un es arī. Viņa bija Batambangā, un es arī. Viņa iepirkās Siemrīpas nakts tirdziņā, un es arī. Viņa pēta Kambodžas vēsturi, konkrēti Sarkano hmeru (Khmer Rouge) režīmu un genocīdu no 1975. līdz 1979. gadam.

Te laikam kopīgais beidzas. Viņai ir daudz vairāk naudas, ko tērēt, un šobrīd viņa uzņem spēlfilmu par Sarkano hmeru teroru. Stāsts būs autobiogrāfisks, balstīts uz grāmatu “Vispirms Viņi Nogalināja Manu Tēvu” un Lungas Angas atmiņām. Andželīna jau daudzus gadus interesējas par Kambodžu, palīdz dažādos humanitāros projektos, un viens no viņas dēliem ir adoptēts no šejienes. Tāpēc saprotams, ka tādas pasaules mēroga slavenības un filmēšanas grupas uzturēšanās mierīgajā Batambangas pilsētā rada lielu burzmu un sastrēgumus.

Kambodžas galvaspilsētā Pnompeņā es apmeklēju Tuol Sleng Genocīda muzeju (S-21). Ļoti traģiska vieta. Sarkanie hmeri bija radikāla un fanātiska komunistu organizācija ar utopisku ideju par visas sabiedrības pārkārtošanu un ideālas zemnieku valsts izveidošanu. Tika likvidētas, skolas, rūpnīcas, nauda, privātīpašums un aizliegta jebkāda reliģija. Viena no šī režīma devīzēm bija “Ja vēlies iegūt bakalaura diplomu, dari to, būvējot dambjus un kanālus.” Vai arī “Izglītība nav svarīga. Svarīgs ir darbs un revolūcija.” (Tas nekas, ka paši ‘revolūcijas’ vadītāji bija guvuši augstāko izglītību, piemēram, Francijā. Arī pats Pols Pots bija studējis Parīzē.) Pilsētas tika iztukšotas, un visa valsts pārvērsta par vienu lielu darba nometni ar izsalkušiem un nomocītiem cilvēkiem. Aptuveni 2 miljoni bojāgājušo četru gadu laikā.

Paaugstinātas Drošības cietums Nr.21 (S-21) tika izvietots vienā no galvaspilsētas labākajām vidusskolām. Bijušās klases kļuva par cietuma kamerām. Pārsvarā te turēja, spīdzināja un nogalināja ‘savējos’ – Sarkanos hmerus, kuri tika apsūdzēti nodevībā. Arī viņu sievas un bēŗni, pat mazuļi, un ģimenes locekļi tika nogalināti. Apmēram 17,000 upuru. Spīdzināšanas mērķis bija noskaidrots, kā labā tu spiego – vai amerikāņu (tātad CIP agents), vai krievu (tātad VDK)?

Sarkanie hmeri fotografēja visus apcietinātos aresta laikā, un daudzus arī pēc nāves. Tagad piemiņai un liecībai ir tūkstošiem fotogrāfiju. Sejas, kas raugās uz mums… ar skumjām, ar smaidu, ar dusmām, apjukumu, cerību un reizē bezcerību un lielām bailēm. Skatos šajās sejās un domāju, kā tā varēju būt es, jo esmu tās desmitgades bērns. Tie varēja būt mani vecāki, vecvecāki, brāļi. Man bija tā laime piedzimt Latvijā, un viņiem bija tā nelaime piedzimt šeit.

Muzejā satiku vienu no nedaudzajiem, kas izdzīvoja. Šo vīrieti sauc Bou Mengs, un viņam tagad ir 72 gadi. Kas viņu izglāba? Spēja zīmēt un gleznot Sarkano hmeru vadītāju portretus. Viņa sieva un divi mazi bērni gan tika pazudināti. Bou Mengs ir pierakstījis savu liecību un atmiņas, un aktīvi piedalās taisnīguma un dziļas pagātnes pētīšanas procesā. Viņš bija liecinieks tiesas prāvā pret vienu no bijušajiem Sarkano hmeru vadītājiem, kas notika visai nesen. Šie tiesu procesi sākās tikai pēc 30 gadiem. (Taisnīguma meklēšana Kambodžā ir garš un sarežģīts stāsts.)

Viens no Kambodžas pētniekiem nonāca pie šāda secinājuma. “Kara laika brutalitāte, Marksistu fanātisms, milzīgs un it kā apdraudēts nacionālisms – tie bija trīs no galvenajiem elementiem, kas noveda līdz šādam totalitāram režīmam. … Mani satriec nevis ļaunuma banalitāte, bet gan tā ‘intelektuālās pretenzijas.” Svarīgi pārdomāt šos vārdus, jo līdzīgas pēc dabas ‘intelektuālas pretenzijas’ jeb pamatojumi pastāv vēl šodien. Kā iegūt imunitāti pret šādām idejām?

Un, nē, es nesatiku Andželīnu Džoliju, bet es gaidīšu viņas jaunāko filmu.

 

Thinker, believer and one of Latvia’s best kept secrets

Few days ago I heard some sad, bitter and sweet news. Sad because I found out that a very special person has passed away. Bitter because I was hoping to meet him again this year. Sweet because I am happy for him… at 88 years old, he has gone to the Big World as he called it. I know he was looking forward to it.

Paulis Klavins – Latvian human rights activist, politician, theologian and social thinker – lived his life well. Sadly I only met him two years ago, but I am very grateful for those meetings. Glad that I recorded our talks and that I got to discuss his views and rich experience in person.

Is it just me or it seems that there is a shortage of people with good common sense? That basic wisdom of how to live responsibly and well in relation to yourself and others. Paulis had such wisdom and it was contagious. I was reading an interview in a respected intellectual magazine “Rigas Laiks” in Latvia where the journalist gave this introduction, “I think in Latvia or at least in its public space there is a lack of people who are brave enough to speak their mind. Even less people who are not only brave, but thinking; and very few who are both thinkers and believers.”

Paulis Klavins was a very significant person in Latvia’s contemporary history. He was born in Latvia but his family became refugees after WWII. They ended up in Germany and there Paulis eventually made his home. His love for Latvia and also his strong faith in Jesus brought him back to Latvia for visits in late 1960’s when Latvia was still behind the Iron Curtain and very much oppressed by the Soviet system. He and his wife became involved with a Christian human rights organization led by Richard Wurmbrand, a Romanian pastor who had suffered torture and many years in Communist prisons.

As a person of action and strong conviction, Paulis asked the question that such people ask, “what can I do? what can people do when they feel so powerless?” There was strong darkness in the form of Soviet ideological lies and system that robbed people of their basic freedoms, even freedom to live. What overcomes any darkness? The Light!!! (The Czech dissident and writer Vaclav Havel wrote his famous essay called “The Power of the Powerless” where he talks about the same struggle – the struggle to live in the Light and resist the Darkness.)

These concepts can seem so abstract and lofty. Like something from “The Lord of the Rings” saga or “Star Wars” movies. Light vs Darkness… but it has very real forms and very real consequences. It is amazing how quickly we forget things. Even about our life in the USSR. I know people who were sent to prison as late as 1983 because of their Christian faith and their free thinking. These were some of the main crimes against the system… To have your own thoughts… To speak Truthfully… To disobey the Communist Party… To promote human rights and freedoms… To honor and protect your conscience…

Paulis, his family and like minded friends in the West organized an amazing (and also underground) network of people on both sides of the Iron Curtain. He made connections and built friendships with believers and people of conscience in the USSR who were suffering and persecuted. It is a long and incredible story and he has written a book, chronicling the history of this Christian human rights group called “The Action of Light” (“Gaismas Akcija”)

Gaismas_akcija_Minsteres_stacija-500x300

I love the motto of the group. “To Shine the Light on Everything and Forgive – the Light Will Win!” These prisoners of conscience did not use military weapons or any kind of violence. Their main resistance was their testimony (not only religious) which revealed the Truth – this was their weapon of Light! The principle and value of forgiveness also revealed their conviction that the highest judge is God because he is Light. His justice will come. It gives a strong and firm foundation – to know that there is an absolute moral clarity and goodness in His judgement.

I talked with Paulis about these concepts and values because one of the crucial things that was destroyed in Latvian society during the years of Soviet system was our belief in justice and righteousness. We were taught to be ‘hypocrites’ – our public actions and private thoughts and conversations did not match. I told my teachers what they ‘needed’ to hear; I gave the Communist pledge even though I didn’t believe in it; I sang the Soviet anthem even though it reminded the tragic fact of Soviet occupation. As one of my friends said it, “we were all pushed down on our knees”.

Paulis Klavins will be missed. As a Latvian, as a Christian, as a thinker, as a truth-seeker and simply a great person. I never felt patronized because he was truly a brother of faith and someone who was always learning. Never claiming that he has ‘arrived’ but always pressing forward in his search for truth and good life. I call him one of Latvia’s best secrets because there are so many people in Latvia who have not even heard his name. Especially the younger generation who was born in free Latvia.

Nobody can fill his shoes but we do need to know what kind of shoes they were! We desperately need to promote this design, this brand. Actions of the Light!

Paulis Kļaviņš

Photos from my personal and P. Klavins archive

Latviski:

Nesen uzzināju skumjas, bēdīgas, bet arī labas vēstis. Skumjas, jo ir miris brīnišķīgs cilvēks. Bēdīgas, jo es cerēju viņu šogad atkal satikt. Labas, jo es priecājos… 88 gadu vecumā šis vīrs ir aizgājis uz Lielo pasauli, kā viņš pats to sauca. Un viņš to ļoti gaidīja.

Paulis Kļaviņš – latvietis, cilvēktiesību aizstāvis, politiķis, teologs un domātājs. Žēl, ka mēs iepazināmies tikai pirms pāris gadiem, bet esmu pateicīga par mūsu tikšanām. Priecājos, ka ierakstīju mūsu sarunas un varēju pārrunāt viņa uzskatus un bagāto dzīves pieredzi.

Vai tikai man, vai arī jums liekas, ka ļoti pietrūkst cilvēku ar patiesu dzīves gudrību? (angļu val. ‘common sense’) To veselo domāšanu, kad tu māki dzīvot savu dzīvi atbildīgi un līdzatbildīgi. Paulim bija šāda gudrība, un tā bija lipīga. Es lasīju interviju žurnālā “Rīgas laiks” 2011. gadā, un A.Rītups raksta: “Manuprāt, Latvijā vai vismaz tās publiskajā telpā trūkst drosmīgu cilvēku, kuri nebaidās teikt, ko domā. Vēl mazāk ir tādu, kas ne tikai ir drosmīgi, bet arī domājoši; pavisam maz ir tādu, kas ir gan domājoši, gan ticoši… Paulis man šķita brīvdomātājs šī vārda vēl nesagandētajā nozīmē, kas paredz, ka patstāvīgas domas brīvībai, nemitīgai gatavībai mācīties un ticības drosmei ir lielāks svars nekā savas taisnības, savu interešu un savu metafizisko bildīšu aizstāvēšanai.”

Paulis Kļaviņš bija un ir ļoti nozīmīga persona Latvijai. Dzimis Latgalē, bet kopā ar ģimeni devies bēgļu gaitās Otrā Pasaules kara laikā. Viņi nonāca Vācijā, kas kļuva par mājām. Bet mīlestība uz Latviju un arī stiprā ticība Dieva dotai brīvībai mudināja braukt uz Latviju 60-tajos gados, kad vēl bija spēcīga Padomju sistēma. Kopā ar sievu Zeltīti, viņi iesaistījās Palīdzības akcijā martīru baznīcai, kuru dibināja Ričards Vurmbrands. Mācītājs no Rumānijas, kurš pats bija daudz cietis un vajāts savas pārliecības dēļ.

Kā jau darītājs un domātājs, Paulis uzdeva jautājumu, ko parasti uzdod aktīvi cilvēki. “Ko es varu darīt? Ko var darīt, kad liekas, ka neko nevar darīt?” Bija sajūta, ka tumsas vara, kas piemita Padomju ideoloģijai un sistēmai, ir liela un stipra. Kas var uzvarēt tumsu? Gaisma!!! Arī čehu politiskā disidenta, rakstnieka un prezidenta Vaclava Havela spēcīgā eseja “Nespēcīgo spēks” (“The Power of the Powerless”) apraksta šo cīņu starp Gaismu un Tumsu.

Šīs idejas var likties tik abstraktas un gaisīgas. Kā no triloģijas “Gredzenu pavēlnieks” vai “Zvaigžņu kari” filmām. Gaisma pret Tumsu… bet tam ir tik reālas izpausmes un reālas sekas. Apbrīnojami, cik ātri mums viss aizmirstas. Pat dzīve bijušajā PSRS. Pazīstu cilvēkus, kas vēl 1983. gadā tika notiesāti, ieslodzīti, izsūtīti vai ielikti ‘trako namā’ savas ticības un brīvo uzskatu dēļ. Tas jau bija tas lielākais noziegums… domāt savas brīvās domas… runāt Patesību… aizstāvēt cilvēktiesības un brīvību… cienīt un klausīt savu sirdsapziņu…

Paulis, viņa ģimene un līdzīgi domājošie izveidoja apbrīnojamus ‘pagrīdes’ sakarus un kontaktus, un rezultātā tapa kristīga cilvēktiesību aizstāvības programma “Gaismas Akcija”. Kā raksta Paulis, visus Gaismas akcijas dalībniekus pavadīja apziņa par savas rīcības dabisko tiesiskumu — uzzināt visu par jebkuru cilvēku, kam tiek apdraudēta dzīvība, brīvība, tiesības un cilvēka cieņa. Tas ir garš un spēlfilmas scenārija cienīgs stāsts, un ir izdota grāmata par “Gaismas Akcijas” vēsturi. Te būs viena informatīva saite.

Mani iedvesmo šīs akcijas devīze. “Visu apgaismot un piedot – gaisma uzvarēs!” Vēl viens citāts: “Tiesa atstājama augstākajam, jo Dievs pats ir gaisma un var vienīgais būt taisnīgs tiesnesis. Šāda devīze šķīra garīgo cīņas lauku no militārā, un tas bija svarīgi mūsu partneriem Latvijā. Ikviens, kurš vēlējās piedalīties un atbalstīt patiesības lieciniekus, kļuva par brīvprātīgas garīgās kopības Gaismas akcijas dalībnieku.”

Mēs ar Pauli daudz pārrunājām šīs idejas un pieredzi, un ko tas nozīmē mūsdienu Latvijai. No intervijas žurnālā “Rīgas Laiks”, “Padomju laika apziņā cilvēks bija pieradis lietot šādu formulu: vienu domāt, citu runāt un trešo darīt, savā veidā trešās pakāpes šizofrēnija. Tas atstāj pēdas. Un viens no satraucošākajiem faktiem, kas ir mūsu sabiedrībā palicis, ir neticība taisnīguma principiālai iespējamībai. Šī ticība ir tik pamatīgi apkarota no padomju sistēmas, visā tanī ietvarā, ko darīja ar cilvēku, kā viņu virzīja, ko viņam lika teikt, kā viņam lika piedalīties melos – tas ir tik pamatīgi izkopts, ka jābrīnās. Kad es sāku strādāt Saeimā, es biju optimists. Pazinu Vācijas demokrātiju un domāju: nu tad tagad uz priekšu kristīgo demokrātu līnijā, un mēs tagad darīsim un veiksim, un uztaisījām pamatprogrammu, visi piekrita. Taču tas neiet. To nevar uzbūvēt tik ātri. Tas prasa laiku.”

Uzdrīkstos teikt, ka mums visiem ļoti pietrūks šis cilvēks. Kā domātājs, kā patiesības meklētājs, kā latvietis, kā kristietis. Kaut gan viņam bija tik liela pieredze, erudīcija un zināšanas, nekad nejūtos ‘pamācīta’. Kāpēc virsrakstā pieteicu Pauli kā vienu no Latvijas labāk slēptajiem dārgumiem? Jo tik daudzi no mums pat nezin viņa vārdu. Vai arī nezin šo vienreizējo un drosmīgo stāstu.

Katram cilvēkam ir savas kurpes un to izmērs. Neviens nevar aizstāt Pauli Kļaviņu, bet mums Latvijā jāzin, kas tās bija par kurpēm! Mums ļoti nepieciešams zināt un atdarināt šo dizainu, šo zīmolu, un mums ir ko eksportēt. Gaismas akcija!

Lessons from Ukraine: peacemaking can be counterintuitive

My current ‘office’ is a nice coffee shop in Riga where I enjoy the warmth and tasty treats. The days are getting shorter and the evenings darker. The air is much colder, too. Is it just me or the autumn is a perfect time for reflections?

As promised in my last post about Nobel Peace Prize laureates, I will continue my thoughts on people who are peacemakers. People who should be honored and supported and imitated. And my mind is in a country not too far from Latvia. Where the days are also getting shorter and the weather colder – Ukraine. I think of people in eastern parts of Ukraine who are bracing for another winter without all the things we appreciate so much. Heat, electricity, food, accessible healthcare…

The global community, including Europe, is facing many challenges and it seems that news headlines change very fast. But the issues and conflicts don’t go away just because the attention shifts elsewhere. I wish I could think of Ukraine as “yesterday’s news” but I cannot. The war in the two eastern provinces – Donestk and Luhansk – is still there. Yes, there is ceasefire (mostly holding) and negotiations and different initiatives but there is no peace. Not yet. And it will not come easily.

One of the things I have learned and start to experience in the times of tension, pressure and conflict is that everyone talks about “peace” but not everyone wants to be a “peacemaker”. Because honestly – real peace is counter intuitive. It goes against our emotions and our normal thoughts. It is much easier to get angry and hateful when you get hurt then to do the hard work of searching for some grace and forgiveness deep inside. It is much easier to blame. It is much easier to seek justice as in ‘eye for an eye’ but it has to be ‘my’ justice. Or even revenge as in “your whole head for my eye’.

In the times of war, the peacemakers can be some of the most ‘unpopular’ people. Admired by many but hated by others. I want to honor all the men and women in Ukraine who are committed to non-violent and sacrificial resistance to any kind of oppression, corruption, aggression and hatred. I hope to meet some them in person in the future. Meanwhile one of the ways we can support peace and restoration in Ukraine is by sharing the stories of love and compassion and great sacrifice.

Through social media and some personal contact I know one of these remarkable men. A local pastor from Donetsk who was forced to leave his home city and his church in 2014 because his humanitarian work was putting him and his family’s life in danger. Sergey Kosyak would not like to be singled out but he has inspired and encouraged thousands of people. In Ukraine and beyond. I love his motto “Do good. It is possible.”

11034265_10153188979282754_3357672451886801251_n

Last year when the violence and conflict broke out, many cities organized prayer tents, including in the Constitution Square of Donetsk. The tent was there for many months with the banner “Pray here for Ukraine” and it united people from all Christian denominations and even other religions. A local Muslim imam joined. They faced harassment, violent opposition, eggs, bottles, even rocks. Eventually the tent was removed by force and destroyed and the prayer movement had to go “underground”.

Here is a story from his FB posts which Sergey Kosyak gave me permission to share. (Also all photos in this post are from his personal archive.) On May 23, 2014 he wrote: “Friends, today was a tough day, but for me very difficult. To begin with, representatives of Donetsk People’s Republic destroyed our tent, and then there was the following story.

Several times I have gone to the city administration building to talk with the leaders of the Donetsk People’s Republic, so I went once again. I didn’t find the person I had talked with earlier there but happened to see someone who attended my church. I was glad when I saw him, but he didn’t seem too glad we met. He began to yell that I was manipulating the people and things like that. In short, the negotiations failed, in the eyes of these people I had become the enemy. You tend to have short conversations with your enemy.

People are very angry, because, first of all, their hearts are empty and not filled with God. I told them that God loves them; I harbored no anger or hatred towards them in my heart, even when they beat me. I will not describe the beating itself, but that I am still alive, is just by the grace of God.

Among them were people who knew about our prayer tent, they cursed the others for what they did to me. After that, they gave me my things back and my money, then asked for forgiveness from me and that I would not be offended.

Before they started beating me I told them about Christ, called them to turn their hearts to God, and while they beat me I just prayed. I couldn’t make it to the prayer meeting in the evening because I had to go to the hospital.

Dark times have come to our region, people hate each other, they’re ready to kill, beat for a preposterous idea, and to die for those ideas. And they cannot see Him for whom it is really worth living and dying. God save the people, turn their attention to You.”

Since my post is getting long, I will continue with other stories later. But let me finish with the same encouragement that is even truer in the dark times… Do good! It is possible!

Volunteer team

Latviski:

Mans patreizējais ‘ofiss’ ir jauka kafejnīca Rīgas centrā. Te ir silts un garšīgi smaržo. Dienas kļūst īsākas, un vakari tumšāki. Gaiss arī daudz aukstāks. Kāpēc rudens vienmēr mani vedina uz dziļām pārdomām?

Kā jau solīju iepriekšējā rakstā par Nobela Miera Prēmijas laureātiem, es turpinu savas domas par cilvēkiem, kuri, manuprāt, ir miera veidotāji. Cilvēki, kurus jāciena, jāatbalsta un jāatdarina. Un manas domas ir valstī, kas nav pārāk tālu no Latvijas. Tur arī dienas kļūst īsākas, un laiks aukstāks. Ukraina. Domāju par cilvēkiem Ukrainas austrumos, kuri gaida kārtējo ziemu bez visām ērtībām un pamatvajadzībām. Siltums, apkure, elektrība, veselības aprūpe…

Pasaulē šobrīd ir daudz grūtību un izaicinājumu, un ziņu virsraksti strauji mainās. Taču problēmas un konflikti nekur neaiziet un nepazūd tikai tāpēc, ka mūsu uzmanība ir vērsta citur. Gribētos, kaut Ukraina būtu ‘vakardienas ziņas’, bet diemžēl tas tā nav. Karš divos austrumu apgabalos – Doņeckā un Luhanskā – turpinās. Jā, ir pamiers (kas pārsvarā tiek ievērots), tiek vestas sarunas, un ir dažādas idejas, bet miers vēl nav iestājies. Un neiestāsies tik drīz, jo smags darbs priekšā.

Es sāku arvien vairāk ievērot un piedzīvot, ka ‘juku’ laikos, kad ir liels sabiedrības spiediens un konflikts, daudzi runā par “mieru”, bet ne visi vēlas kļūt par “miera veidotājiem”. Jo atklāti runājot – īsts miers nav pašsaprotams. Tas ir pat pretrunā mūsu tā brīža emocijām un domām. Ir daudz vieglāk un ‘loģiskāk’ ļauties dusmām un naidam, ja tev kāds dara pāri. Nekā cīnīties ar naidu, un meklēt sevī spēju sniegt kaut kripatiņu žēlastības un piedošanas. Ir daudz vieglāk vainot. Ir daudz vieglāk dzīties pēc taisnības, lai būtu “acs pret aci”. Vēl vieglāk dzīties pēc atriebības, lai būtu “visa tava galva pret manu aci”.

Kara laikā mieru turošie var kļūt ļoti nepopulāri. Vieni viņus apbrīno, citi ienīst vai nosoda. Es gribu izteikt dziļu cieņu visiem cilvēkiem Ukrainā, kuri izvēlas cīnīties pret visa veida agresiju, korpupciju un naidu, bet ar nevardarbīgiem līdzekļiem. Tas prasa no viņiem ļoti daudz. Es ceru kādreiz satikt viņus personīgi, bet šobrīd es vēlos atbalstīt šo pašaizliedzīgo miera celšanas darbu Ukrainā, nododot tālāk stāstus par mīlestību, žēlsirdību un cerību.

Caur soctīkliem un saraksti, es pazīstu vienu lielisku cilvēku, kurš ir šajā komandā. Vietējais mācītājs no Doņeckas, kurš 2014. gadā bija spiests pamest savas mājas un dzimto pilsētu, jo viņa labdarība apdraudēja viņu pašu un ģimeni – sievu un bērnus. Sergejs Kosjaks negribētu, ka viņu īpaši izceļ, bet viņs ir iedvesmojis un iedrošinājis tūkstošiem cilvēku. Gan Ukrainā, gan ārpus tās. Man patīk viņa motto: “Dari labu. Tas ir iespējams.”

Pagājšgad, kad spriedze pārauga vardarbībā, daudzās pilsētās tika uzceltas lūgšanu teltis. Arī Doņeckas centrā, Konstitūcijas laukumā. Telts tur stāvēja vairākus mēnešus zem plakāta “Šeit aizlūdz par Ukrainu”, un lūgšanas apvienoja cilvēkus no visām kristīgām konfesijām. Pievienojās arī vietējais muslimu kopienas vadītājs. Viņi tika nosodīti, apsaukāti, pat apmētāti ar olām, pudelēm akmeņiem. Beigu beigās telts tika ar varu nojaukta, un aizlūdzēji nogāja “pagrīdē”.

Šeit viens īss stāsts no Sergeja Kosjaka Facebook lapas. (Viņš man deva atļauju izmantot gan stāstus, gan foto.) 2014. gada 23. maijā viņš rakstīja tā: “Draugi, šodien bija smaga diena, bet man pašam ļoti grūta. Iesākumā Doņeckas Tautas Republikas pārstāvji iznīcināja mūsu telti, un pēc tam sekoja šis notikums.

Vairākas reizes esmu gājis uz pilsētas administrācijas ēku, lai runātu ar Doņeckas Tautas Republikas pārstāvjiem. Tāpēc gāju arī šajā reizē. Nesatiku cilvēku, ar kuru runāju iepriekšējās reizēs, bet satiku kādu, kurš agrāk bija manā draudzē. Es priecājos viņu redzēt, bet viņš nelikās pārāk priecīgs. Viņš sāka kliegt, kas es grozot cilvēkiem prātus, utt. Vārdu sakot, nekādas sarunas nesanāca, jo viņu acīs es biju kļuvis par ienaidnieku. Un ar ienaidniekiem ir īsas sarunas.

Cilvēki ir ļoti dusmīgi. Pirmkārt, viņu sirdis ir tukšas, un tās nepiepilda Dievs. Es teicu viņiem, ka Dievs viņus ļoti mīl, ka es nedusmojos un neienīstu viņus. Pat tad, kad viņi sāka mani sist. Es nestāstīšu daudz par savu piekaušanu, bet tā ir Dieva žēlastība, ka paliku dzīvs.

Tur bija arī kādi, kuri zināja par mūsu lūgšanu telti. Viņi nolamāja tos, kuri mani piekāva. Tad viņi atdeva visas manas mantas un naudu un lūdza piedošanu. Lūdza, lai es neapvainojoties.

Pirms tiku sists, es stāstīju viņiem par Kristu. Aicināju vērst savas sirdis uz Dievu. Lūdzu Dievu, kamēr tiku sists. Vakarā gan es netiku uz lūgšanu sapulci, jo braucu uz slimnīcu.

Mūsu pusē ir pienākuši drūmi laiki. Cilvēki ienīst viens otru, ir gatavi nogalināt un sist kaut kādu iedomātu ideju dēļ. Ir gatavi arī šo ideju dēļ mirt. Un viņi neredz Personu, kura dēļ tiešām ir vērts dzīvot un mirt. Dievs, izglāb ļaudis.”

Vēl ir daudz stāsti, bet tos vēlāk. Nobeigumā es gribu citēt vēlreiz šos iedrošinājuma vārdus… Dari labu! Tas ir iespējams!

Hannover and Hiroshima and the church without roof

So many reflections after my recent trip to Hannover, Germany. I had the most unusual tour of the city. It told a story of significant past, diverse community, powerful kings and fascinating facts, but also tragedy, violence and beauty from the ashes. In the literal sense.

In just one night of October 8, 1943, more than 200,000 bombs were dropped on the city of Hannover. Not much was left standing. I think of my own city, Riga, and what it looked like after the war. I think of Sarajevo in Bosnia, Aleppo in Syria, Gaza in Palestine, towns and cities in eastern Ukraine…

Now you walk around and enjoy beautiful buildings and parks and street-side cafes. You see people enjoying a good life. You see diverse cultures welcomed here. Hannover is a very nice place to be. Still, the scars remain and I appreciate how people in Germany do not hide from these scars. As painful and ugly as they are. It speaks about healing and restoration.

There is a church without roof, now covered by our beautiful sky. Aegidienkirche originated in the 14th Century. It was destroyed in a bomb attack in 1943 and has not been rebuilt. Its ruin is now a memorial to the victims of war and violence. Like many other people before me, I stood there thinking, “If these ruins could speak…”

Hannovere 53

The church has a Peace Bell, which the city of Hannover received in 1985 from its partner town of Hiroshima. The bell has a twin, which hangs in Hiroshima. Every 6th August a special memorial service to commemorate the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima is held in this church. As part of this service the peace bell is rung at the same time as its twin in Hiroshima chimes.

There is a statue of person who embraces. The person is on his/her knees. To me it shows humility, brokenness and longing to embrace and to be embraced. When we speak about forgiveness and repentance and redemption, there are many powerful and beautiful symbols. During workshops on reconciliation I ask for mental pictures and commonly people see ’embrace’ or ‘handshake’.

‘Ubuntu’ is an African thought and expression which is usually translated as “humanity toward others”. No wonder my African friends love to hug and to hold hands. There is something deep within us that tells us that an act of embrace is the acknowledgement that ‘I am what I am because of who we all are’. Archbishop Desmond Tutu from South Africa describes it like this, “A person with Ubuntu is open and available to others, affirming of others, does not feel threatened that others are able and good, based from a proper self-assurance that comes from knowing that he or she belongs in a greater whole and is diminished when others are humiliated or diminished, when others are tortured or oppressed.”

And one more thought as I reflect on this embrace. Theologian Miroslav Volf from Croatia said it the best: “Forgiveness flounders because I exclude the enemy from the community of humans even as I exclude myself from the community of sinners.”

Hannovere 58